Survey finds employers, workers disagree on what drives retention


Disconnect on keeping people: Survey finds employers, workers disagree on what drives retention

By Mackenzi Klemann - mklemann@limanews.com



A recent survey from Spherion found that about 29% of working adults plan to leave their job within the next 12 months.

A recent survey from Spherion found that about 29% of working adults plan to leave their job within the next 12 months.


Metro Creative

LIMA — A disconnect between employers and workers may be driving turnover, as businesses struggle to hire and retain employees with unemployment at 50-year lows.

A recent survey from U.S. staffing company Spherion found that about 29% of working adults plan to leave their job within the next 12 months. Compensation, benefits, growth and earnings potential and flexibility were cited as the top four issues driving retention for U.S. workers.

Employers, meanwhile, listed benefits, supervisor relationship, compensation and management climate as the top four issues they believe determine whether an employee stays or goes.

Spherion surveyed 731 human resource managers and 2,115 employed adults, asking a series of questions about workplace culture, wages and employee satisfaction for its annual emerging workforce study. The survey found 71% of employer respondents believe non-financial incentives make up for lower pay, while only 47% of workers agreed.

“What we’re seeing here in northwest Ohio, I think a lot of our employers are not doing a great job at understanding their employees,” said Karen Grothouse, CEO of Spherion Lima. “Employers think a little bit differently than employees. My thought is – talk to your employees to try to understand what they are feeling.”

Compensation remains a key issue, particularly for millennials, whom the survey found were less satisfied with their salaries and advancement prospects than adult workers overall.

“They’re thinking they should be paid a lot higher than what they are,” said Gail Ferro, vice president of marketing and public relations for Spherion.

Ferro said more than half of millennials surveyed don’t believe they’re receiving enough training either.

Grothouse called it a Catch-22: Companies are so short-staffed now that they are often unable to train their employees, who in turn are less effective.

“They don’t have time to train, but if they don’t train they’re going to lose that person,” she said.

But competition between employers for talent may be good for workers.

David McClough, an associate professor of economics at Ohio Northern University’s Dicke College of Business Administration, previously told The Lima News that workers will see greater wage increases once employers start poaching from rival firms.

“Companies always need to understand that compensation is going to play a role in keeping an employee,” Grothouse said. “… but we also understand that some employers just can’t offer that top wage. We have to figure out with that employer, OK, what can we do to make that (company more attractive).”

A recent survey from Spherion found that about 29% of working adults plan to leave their job within the next 12 months.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2019/07/web1_C184QP40026C-page-0.jpgA recent survey from Spherion found that about 29% of working adults plan to leave their job within the next 12 months. Metro Creative
Disconnect on keeping people: Survey finds employers, workers disagree on what drives retention

By Mackenzi Klemann

mklemann@limanews.com

Reach Mackenzi Klemann at 567-242-0456.

Reach Mackenzi Klemann at 567-242-0456.

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