What employers want


Some areas expected to grow locally in third quarter

By Camri Nelson - cnelson@limanews.com



Connor Koch, Taylor Darnell and Jared Rieman work together during a class at Rhodes State College last week. The college’s West Central Ohio Manufacturing Consortium offers a computer numerical control certification.

Connor Koch, Taylor Darnell and Jared Rieman work together during a class at Rhodes State College last week. The college’s West Central Ohio Manufacturing Consortium offers a computer numerical control certification.


Richard Parrish | The Lima News

LIMA — Training for jobs in the manufacturing, wholesale and retail trade, information, professional and business services, and leisure and hospitality fields will be essential in West Central Ohio, as employers are expected to hire more employees in those fields between July and September, according to a report from Manpower of Dayton.

According to the ManpowerGroup Employment Outlook Survey, the net employment outlook for the West Central Ohio in the third quarter is 18 percent, with 24 percent of businesses planning to increase staff levels, 6 percent planning decreases in staff levels and 70 percent maintaining staff levels.

“Employees in West Central Ohio anticipate a stronger hiring pace compared to Q2 2018 when the net employment outlook was 17 percent,” said Joanie Krein, ManpowerGroup spokesperson, in a news release. “At this time last year, employers expected more hiring activity when the outlook was 24 percent.”

The best job hiring prospects are in durable goods manufacturing; nondurable goods manufacturing; information; wholesale and retail trade; professional and business services; and leisure and hospitality, according to the release.

Industries such as construction; transportation and utilities’; education and health services; and financial activities are expected to remain stagnant, according to the release.

LEISURE AND HOSPITALITY

John Strouse, an assistnat professor and chair professor at University of Northwestern Ohio in travel and hotel management, said there will be more hiring during the third quarter because people will have a better sense of the economy and have a larger disposable income.

“This causes people to attend more events like festivals, parks and zoos,” Strouse said. “That, in turn, gives you larger occupancies at hotels and restaurants, and therefore you need a bigger workforce.”

Through the travel and hotel management courses at UNOH, students learn a gamut of information about event planning, casinos and hospitality. Students can earn a travel and hotel management associate’s degree within two years, if they go full time, according to Strouse.

Once they graduate, they can began their career as a front desk supervisor, an event manager or an entry-level management position in the industry.

“One student who was in program currently works at Disney World,” Strouse said. “That goes to show you that this industry can take you anywhere you want to go.”

DURABLE AND NONDURABLE MANUFACTURING

Doug Durliat, the director of West Central Ohio Manufacturing Consortium at Rhodes State College, said hiring will go up during the third quarter because of two factors: it is a well-paying job, and people need more education.

“There has been a lot of market sales that require welding, machinery and other skilled areas,” Durliat said. “However, people who want to get into manufacturing may not be highly skilled enough.

“It’s not just manual labor anymore. It’s understanding how to interface and program with technology working with computerization and automation, as opposed to the grunt labor and repetition motion of labor that used to be associated with manufacturing.”

Through the West Central Ohio Manufacturing Consortium, students who are looking to get into the durable and nondurable manufacturing industry can earn a computer numerical control certification.

Through this 22-credit program, students learn about computer applications in the workplace, technical math courses, engineering graphics, operations management and more.

Manufacturing is a field that Durliat believes people should go into because it does not require a lot of schooling, and it has a good-paying salary.

“As long as you have the skillset, you can go into an industry that pays exceptionally well,” Durliat said. “Manufacturing jobs typically pay better than service sector jobs. They tend to have better benefit packages, and if that’s the kind of work you don’t mind, that’s a great way to make a living.”

INFORMATION AND WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE

Lima City Schools Career Technical Education Coordinator Wanda Miller said the information and the wholesale and retail trade industry need more employees because it’s essential to helping the economy run.

Through marketing programs, students who are looking to go into the wholesale and retail trade field will learn about merchandise purchasing, merchandise selling and merchandise display.

At this time, students who take the course will not earn a certificate, but Miller said the students still benefit from the course.

“Most of marketing students are well versed in soft skills and through competitions, it helps better prepare them for the future,” Miller said. “Students can go straight into the industry and work in retail, but we recommend the college route.”

As far the information field, students can enroll in the information technology program and learn about graphic design, videos and developing computer programs.

This program does offer various certificates for their students. Some students who have earned the certificate have been able to skip courses in college because of their experience.

“It kind of jump-starts their college experience a little bit,” said Miller. “What makes this career center great is that we have an on-site location at Lima Senior, and it’s like a smaller scale of Apollo Career Center.”

Connor Koch, Taylor Darnell and Jared Rieman work together during a class at Rhodes State College last week. The college’s West Central Ohio Manufacturing Consortium offers a computer numerical control certification.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2018/06/web1_rhodes-RP-001.jpgConnor Koch, Taylor Darnell and Jared Rieman work together during a class at Rhodes State College last week. The college’s West Central Ohio Manufacturing Consortium offers a computer numerical control certification. Richard Parrish | The Lima News
Some areas expected to grow locally in third quarter

By Camri Nelson

cnelson@limanews.com

Reach Camri Nelson at 567-242-0456 or on Twitter @CamriNews

Reach Camri Nelson at 567-242-0456 or on Twitter @CamriNews

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