Entertainment roundup: GMA’s Robach sorry for ‘colored people’ reference


Amy Robach apologized for using the term “colored people” for African-Americans on Monday’s broadcast of the ABC program. After the broadcast, Robach released a statement explaining she had meant to say “people of color.” She called the incident “a mistake” and “not at all a reflection of how I feel or speak in my everyday life.”

Amy Robach apologized for using the term “colored people” for African-Americans on Monday’s broadcast of the ABC program. After the broadcast, Robach released a statement explaining she had meant to say “people of color.” She called the incident “a mistake” and “not at all a reflection of how I feel or speak in my everyday life.”


Evan Agostini | Invision/AP

NEW YORK — “Good Morning America” co-anchor Amy Robach has apologized for saying “colored people” on Monday’s broadcast of the ABC program.

Her use of the term sparked criticism on social media. “Offensive,” tweeted one viewer. Another said Robach “gets a pass this time” but vowed to ditch “GMA” for a rival morning program if it happened again.

During a segment on diversity in Hollywood, Robach, who was substituting for Robin Roberts, noted recent criticism for casting white actors “in what one might assume should be a role reserved for colored people.”

After the broadcast, Robach released a statement explaining she had meant to say “people of color.”

She called the incident “a mistake” and “not at all a reflection of how I feel or speak in my everyday life.”

The words used to describe African-Americans have evolved over time to from words like Negro, colored, Afro-American to the current black, African-American and people of color, said Deborah E. McDowell, director of the University of Virginia’s Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies.

“We no longer use the term colored people, although once upon a time that was a term in use,” McDowell said. “Now the preferred usage is people of color if you are speaking about people of color broadly. If you are referring specifically to African-Americans, people will frequently be specific and refer to us as African-Americans.”

Franklin canceling performances to rest up

NEW YORK — Aretha Franklin is canceling some upcoming concerts to rest up.

The 74-year-old singer said in a statement Monday that “due to doctors’ orders I will have to cancel a few concerts for the next month or so,” including an Aug. 26 show at the Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts near Vienna, Virginia.

Franklin is canceling two performances at New York City’s Radio City Music Hall: She’ll skip “Tony Bennett Celebrates 90” on Sept. 15 and a solo show on Sept. 23.

The Queen of Soul said she should be back on the road in November. She canceled a show in Las Vegas last year because of exhaustion.

Filmmaker who made illustrations into moving images dies

WESTON, Conn. — An Oscar-nominated filmmaker who developed a technique to transform illustrations from children’s books into moving images for films has died at his Connecticut home. Morton Schindel was 98.

Scholastic Inc. senior vice president Kyle Good says Schindel died of natural causes Saturday in Weston. Scholastic bought Schindel’s company, Weston Woods Studios, in 1996.

Schindel’s filmmaking technique involved using cameras to make original artwork from books move across the screen. It was used in the 1973 film “Where the Wild Things Are,” based on Maurice Sendak’s children’s book of the same name.

The Orange, New Jersey, native and former New York resident produced more than 300 movies and 450 recordings.

In 1986, he received an Academy Award nomination for “Doctor De Soto,” based on the children’s book by William Steig.

Neil Young speaking to Dan Rather on ‘The Big Interview’

LOS ANGELES — Neil Young is Dan Rather’s first guest for the new edition of Rather’s series, “The Big Interview.”

Young will be featured on the Sept. 13 episode airing at 8 p.m. EDT on AXS TV, the cable and satellite channel said Monday. The singer-songwriter discusses his new album, “Earth” and topics including his childhood polio and his experience with the band Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young.

Other music stars to be interviewed by Rather this season include Meat Loaf (airing Sept. 20); Martina McBride (Sept. 27); Olivia Newton-John (Oct. 4) and Michael Buble (Oct. 11). Additional guests will be announced, AXS TV said.

A marathon of past “Big Interview” shows will air starting at 8 a.m. EDT on Sept. 10, including Rather’s conversations with Frankie Valli, Merle Haggard, Gene Simmons and Loretta Lynn. An interview with the trio of Crosby, Stills & Nash will air at 10 a.m. EDT as part of the retrospective.

Louisa May Alcott’s family home spared by tornado

CONCORD, Mass. — A tornado that briefly touched down in the Massachusetts town of Concord uprooted trees and damaged dozens of houses but spared the family home of author Louisa May Alcott.

The National Weather Service says the EF1 tornado had winds of about 100 mph. EF1 is the second-lowest of six tornado levels. It struck just after 3 a.m. Monday.

Meteorologist Alan Dunham says it caused a swath of damage about a half-mile long.

Fire officials say 39 homes were damaged, including one that suffered significant structural damage.

But Louisa May Alcott’s Orchard House was untouched. The historic house and museum’s Facebook page says the tornado “hit right above” the home and knocked out power, but the building was unscathed.

The home is where Alcott wrote her 1868 novel, “Little Women.”

Amy Robach apologized for using the term “colored people” for African-Americans on Monday’s broadcast of the ABC program. After the broadcast, Robach released a statement explaining she had meant to say “people of color.” She called the incident “a mistake” and “not at all a reflection of how I feel or speak in my everyday life.”
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2016/08/web1_112036903-a2a19592854d4d01acee55d0c511b915.jpgAmy Robach apologized for using the term “colored people” for African-Americans on Monday’s broadcast of the ABC program. After the broadcast, Robach released a statement explaining she had meant to say “people of color.” She called the incident “a mistake” and “not at all a reflection of how I feel or speak in my everyday life.” Evan Agostini | Invision/AP

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