Fiction

“The Committed” by Viet Thanh Nguyen

The long-awaited follow-up to the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Sympathizer, which has sold more than one million copies worldwide, “The Committed” follows the man of two minds as he arrives in Paris in the early 1980s with his blood brother Bon. The pair try to overcome their pasts and ensure their futures by engaging in capitalism in one of its purest forms: drug dealing.

“The Water Keeper” by Charles Martin

Murphy Shepherd is a man with many secrets. He lives alone on an island, tending the grounds of a church with no parishioners, and he’s dedicated his life to rescuing those in peril. But as he mourns the loss of his mentor and friend, Murph himself may be more lost than he realizes.

“On Fragile Waves” by E. Lily Yu

Firuzeh and her brother Nour are children of fire, born in an Afghanistan fractured by war. When their parents, their Atay and Abay, decide to leave, they spin fairy tales of their destination, the mythical land and opportunities of Australia. When they arrive in Australia, what seemed like a stable shore gives way to treacherous currents.

“The Sun Down Motel” by Simone St. James

Upstate New York, 1982. Viv Delaney wants to move to New York City, and to help pay for it she takes a job as the night clerk at the Sun Down Motel. But something isnʼt right at the motel, something haunting and scary. Upstate New York, 2017. Carly Kirk has never been able to let go of the story of her aunt Viv, who mysteriously disappeared from the Sun Down before she was born. She decides to move to Fell and visit the motel.

Non-Fiction

“The Hardest Place: The American Military Adrift in Afghanistan’s Pech Valley” by Wesley Morgan

Through reporting trips, hundreds of interviews with Americans and Afghans, and documentary research, Morgan writes vividly of large-scale missions gone awry, years-long hunts for single individuals, and the soldiers, Marines, commandos, and intelligence operatives who cycle through, along with several who return again and again to the same slowly evolving fight.

“Come Fly the World: The Jet-Age Story of the Women of Pan Am” by Julia Cooke

Required to have a college education, speak two languages, and possess the political savvy of a Foreign Service officer, a jet-age stewardess serving on iconic Pan Am between 1966 and 1975 also had to be between 5′3” and 5′9”, between 105 and 140 pounds, and under 26 years of age at the time of hire.

“The Gun, the Ship, and the Pen: Warfare, Constitutions, and the Making of the Modern World” by Linda Colley

A work of extraordinary range and striking originality, this book traces the global history of written constitutions from the 1750s to the twentieth century, modifying accepted narratives and uncovering the close connections between the making of constitutions and the making of war. In the process, Linda Colley both reappraises famous constitutions and recovers those that have been marginalized but were central to the rise of a modern world.

“The Disordered Cosmos: A Journey into Dark Matter, Spacetime, and Dreams Deferred” by Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

One of the leading physicists of her generation, Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein is also one of fewer than one hundred Black American women to earn a PhD from a department of physics. Her vision of the cosmos is vibrant, buoyantly non-traditional, and grounded in Black feminist traditions.

Children’s

“No Fixed Address” by Susin Nielsen

Felix Knutsson is 12 and three quarters years old and loves trivia. His mom has a hard time keeping jobs so they get evicted from their apartment and have to live in their van. His mom makes him promise not to tell anyone their living arrangement so he won’t be taken away from her. Then one day, Felix gets an audition for a junior edition of Who, What, Where, When show, he’s determined to get a spot on it for a chance to win the cash prize, but things don’t turn out the way he expects.

Ages: 10 and up

https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2021/03/web1_LimaPublicLibrary-3.jpg

Post navigation