Jordan in lead role in Trump’s impeachment defense


By Josh Ellerbrock - jellerbrock@limanews.com



U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Urbana, an ally of President Donald Trump, meets with his team Wednesday as Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., announces the conclusion of the impeachment vote against President Donald Trump for his role in inciting an angry mob to storm the Congress.

U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Urbana, an ally of President Donald Trump, meets with his team Wednesday as Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., announces the conclusion of the impeachment vote against President Donald Trump for his role in inciting an angry mob to storm the Congress.


J. Scott Applewhite | AP

LIMA — According to U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan, Democrats pursued impeachment because the “left wants to cancel the president.”

“It’s always about getting the president, no matter what,” Jordan said on the House floor a week after an enraged mob of Trump supporters breached the Capitol and killed a police officer.

“This is about canceling the president, canceling all the people you disagree with,” Jordan said. “That’s what scares me more than anything. We have seen it play out over the past several days. I never thought I would see anything that we are now witnessing.”

Responsible for doling out time to his Republican colleagues, Jordan played a prominent role defending Trump’s actions during Wednesday’s House debate. For many, the involvement of the congressman from Urbana, whose district includes Lima, wasn’t exactly surprising. Just this past Monday, Trump awarded Jordan the Presidential Medal of Freedom for defending him during his first impeachment.

Other Republican members weren’t so quick to take up the president’s cause. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, for example, said Trump was responsible for the attack although he ultimately chose not to vote for impeachment. A similar statement was made by U.S. Rep. Bob Latta, R-Bowling Green, who also voted against impeachment.

“The President’s reprehensible rhetoric leading up to January 6 and on that morning were a moral failure. There were many instances, one of which occurred during a speech on the National Mall before the mob broke into the Capitol, where the President again pressured Vice President Pence to exceed his constitutional duty during the certification of the election,” Latta said in a press release.

Latta clarified that his vote against impeachment was because of the quick speed of the process, which was undertaken in a matter of days.

By the end of the vote, 10 Republicans, including U.S. Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyoming, joined with Democrats to impeach Trump.

The next step in the process will be to send the articles of impeachment to the Senate, but it’s unclear if the legislative body will be able to convict Trump. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has signaled he does not plan to reconvene for the impeachment trial, which would leave the task to the next Senate.

That brings its own problems. According to Ohio Northern University Law Professor Dr. Scott Douglas Gerber, impeachment exists to protect the nation from being injured by government officials, and when Trump leaves office on Jan. 20, he won’t be in a position to do so.

“A lot of people believe that you cannot try a former president because the purpose of impeachment is to protect the polity from damage and potential harm from someone holding office,” Dr. Gerber said. “He won’t be in office anymore.”

U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Urbana, an ally of President Donald Trump, meets with his team Wednesday as Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., announces the conclusion of the impeachment vote against President Donald Trump for his role in inciting an angry mob to storm the Congress.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2021/01/web1_AP21013816673504.jpgU.S. Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Urbana, an ally of President Donald Trump, meets with his team Wednesday as Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., announces the conclusion of the impeachment vote against President Donald Trump for his role in inciting an angry mob to storm the Congress. J. Scott Applewhite | AP

By Josh Ellerbrock

jellerbrock@limanews.com

Reach Josh Ellerbrock at 567-242-0398.

Reach Josh Ellerbrock at 567-242-0398.

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