Today’s latest updates on the coronavirus pandemic


ONLY ON LIMAOHIO.COM

See more local coverage about COVID-19 at LimaOhio.com/tag/coronavirus.

Hotline

• Lima hospitals established a Community Call Center at 419-226-9000. Residents are urged to call that number before visiting a health care provider or an emergency room. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week.

• Call the Ohio Department of Health’s public COVID-19 hotline: 833-4-ASK-ODH. The hotline will be open from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., seven days a week.

Prevention tips

• Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds. Do so after coughing, sneezing, blowing your nose, visiting a public place. Use soap and water or sanitizer that is at least 60% alcohol.

• Cover your coughs and sneezes, and wash your hands after.

• Avoid close contact with people who are sick, and avoid people altogether if the virus is spreading in your area.

Symptoms of respiratory illness

COVID-19:

• Fever

• Cough

• Trouble breathing

• Starts about 2 to 14 days after exposure

Influenza:

• Sudden onset

• Fever (sometimes)

• Cough

• Sore throat

• Runny or stuffy nose

• Muscle or body aches

• Headaches

• Fatigue

• Vomiting and diarrhea (mainly in children)

Common cold:

• Slight aches and fatigue

• Sneezing

• Chest discomfort, cough

• Runny or stuffy nose

• Sore throat

Who is considered more at risk?

• Older people.

• People with chronic health conditions like heart disease, lung disease and diabetes.

What if I have symptoms?

• Call your doctor. The medical team will need to ask you questions about your symptoms and travel history. Do not visit the doctor’s office without calling ahead, as the doctor may not want you to come in and potentially expose others.

• Monitor yourself closely, especially if you get worse instead of better. If you are having trouble breathing, have persistent pain or pressure in your chest, have new confusion or have bluish lips or face, call your doctor.

• If you have symptoms and have a regular scheduled doctor appointment, call before going. Put on a mask before entering the office.

• If COVID-19 is suspected, ask your doctor to report your case to the local health department or the Ohio Department of Health.

What if I am sick?

• Stay home. Do not go to work, school or the store. Avoid public areas. Do not use public transportation. Stay away from the public until you’re told by your doctor it’s safe.

• Set up a sick room. Rest in a room separate from others in the household. Use a separate bathroom, if available.

• Limit contact with pets. Keep the family pet out of the sick room, or have someone else do your farm chores. If you must care for your animals, wash your hands before and after and wear a mask. There are no reports of animals becoming sick with COVID-19, but more information is needed.

Should I wear a mask?

• If you are sick, wear a mask to contain your coughs if you must be around others. Put it on before a person caring for you enters the sick room.

• If you are caring for someone who is sick, and that person cannot wear a mask for any reason, you should wear a mask when visiting the sick room. Stay 6 feet away from them, and do not linger.

General household tips

• Do not share dishes, towels or bedding with anyone who is sick.

• Clean and disinfect the things you touch often, like doorknobs, bathroom fixtures and phones. Clean up bodily fluids quickly and thoroughly.

Does it have a season, like flu?

• It is unknown if the beginning of warmer temperatures will have an effect on slowing down the spread of this virus.

The following will not kill/prevent this virus:

• Hot baths, hand dryers, UV lamps, alcohol or chlorine all over your body, pneumonia or flu vaccine, nose saline sprays, eating garlic, antibiotics.

Why is it called COVID-19?

• CO stands for corona, VI for virus and D for disease. The number refers to the year it started.

What businesses are considered essential?

Examples from Allen County Public Health include:

• Stores that sell groceries and medicine

• Food, beverage, licensed marijuana production and agriculture

• Organizations that provide charitable and social services

• Religious entities

• Media

• First amendment protected speech

• Gas stations and businesses needed for transportation

• Financial and insurance institutions

• Hardware and supply stores

• Critical trades

• Mail, post, shipping, logistics, delivery, and pick-up services

• Educational institutions

• Laundry services

• Restaurants for consumption off-premises

• Supplies to work from home

• Supplies for essential businesses and operations

• Transportation

• Home-based care and services

• Residential facilities and shelters

• Professional services

• Manufacture, distribution, supply chain for critical products and industries

• Critical labor union functions

• Hotel and motels

• Funeral services

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Ohio Department of Health, World Health Organization, Allen County Health District

Here are the latest details about the state and region’s issues with the COVID-19 pandemic:

• There are now 867 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Ohio, up from 704 on Wednesday. There are 15 deaths, up from Wednesday’s 10. There are 223 hospitalizations, including 91 in intensive care units.

• The range of people affected is less than 1 year old to 94, with a median age of 51. Of those who tested positive, 53 percent were males, and 47 percent were females.

• An expanded COVID-19 data dashboard has been designed by the InnovateOhio Platform and is now available online.

The dashboard displays the most recent preliminary data reported to the Ohio Department of Health about COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths in Ohio by selected demographics and county of residence.

There are 867 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Ohio and 15 deaths. A total of 223 people have been hospitalized, including 91 admissions to intensive care units.

In-depth data on the new dashboard can be accessed by visiting coronavirus.ohio.gov.

• Lima schools will now be placing food distributions into vehicles to minimize contact. The next distribution will be from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday at all buildings. Beginning April 6, if school is not back in session, distributions will be at Freedom, Heritage, Independence and Unity elementary schools, Liberty Arts Magnet, North Middle School and Lima Senior High School.

• Weekly blood drives have been added each Tuesday from March 31 to April 28 at the American Red Cross Lima Chapter Office. See more at www.limaohio.com/calendar.

• Mercy Health announced it won’t send patient statements and billing for anyone dealing with COVID-19-related issues. The goal is to eliminate financial barriers to accessing care and treatment. No upfront payments will be required. Mercy Health will bill insurance but not send patient statements until it finalizes details with insurance companies, lab partners and state and federal governments.

• Community Health Services is now offering TeleHealth medical and behavioral health appointments, so people can access services without leaving their home. New patients are welcome. For information or to schedule an appointment, call 419-334-3869 or visit CHSOhio.com.

• The FBI announced it has seen a number of fraud schemes related to COVID-19. People should look out for fake emails from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, emails asking you to verify information for an economic stimulus check or to provide personally identifiable information for other reasons. Don’t open attachments or click on links from unfamiliar senders. Don’t provide information such as your username, password, birth date, Social Security number or any other kind of financial or personal information. Double-check the web address of legitimate websites, avoiding misspellings or wrong domains (such as .gov addresses ended in .com instead). If you believe you are the victim of an internet scam or cyber crime, visit the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at ic3.gov.

• Sixteen inmates in the state penal system have been tested for the COVID-19 virus and 12 of those tests have returned negative results, the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction said Thursday. The results of four tests are still pending. There have been no confirmed positive tests.

• Emergency Roadside Assistance is an essential business under Gov. DeWine’s Stay at Home Order. This enables AAA to continue offering 24/7 Emergency Road Service to all members.

To help those on the front line of the virus, AAA is also now providing free emergency road service for healthcare workers and first responders. AAA will work with the motorist to help arrange alternative transportation. The AAA technician will remain with the motorist until transportation arrives.

• State Rep. Dave Greenspan (R-Westlake) voted Wednesday in support of House Bill 197, to enact several emergency measures in response to the recent COVID-19 pandemic in Ohio. The bill passed unanimously out of both the Ohio House and the Ohio Senate.

House Bill 197, introduced by Representatives Jena Powell (R-Arcanum) and Derek Merrin (R-Monclova) last year to make technical corrections to Ohio’s tax laws, was amended to include several provisions addressing various issues which have arisen in the wake of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Among the provisions amended into House Bill 197 is an extension of the absentee voting period for the March 17 primary election. In-person polling locations were ordered closed by the Ohio Department of Health on March 16 due to the ongoing public health emergency. House Bill 197 will now extend the window for registered voters to mail in their absentee ballots to April 28. All absentee ballots postmarked by that date will be counted in the final tally of the March 17 primary results.

• Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, Lt. Gov. Jon Husted, and Dr. Amy Acton, MD, MPH, continue to remind Ohioans of the oncoming shortage of personal protective equipment such as masks, goggles, gloves, gowns and face shields for healthcare workers and first responders.

Taking care of a patient who is in intensive care for a 24-hour shift requires: 36 pairs of gloves, 14 gowns, three pairs of goggles and 13 N-95 face masks.

The state of Ohio is asking residents and businesses who can donate PPE, or any other essential service or resource, to email together@governor.ohio.gov.

Staff will receive these emails and coordinate how these resources can best be used to benefit all Ohioans.

Share your information at info@limanews.com.

https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2020/03/web1_coronavirus-158.jpg

ONLY ON LIMAOHIO.COM

See more local coverage about COVID-19 at LimaOhio.com/tag/coronavirus.

Hotline

• Lima hospitals established a Community Call Center at 419-226-9000. Residents are urged to call that number before visiting a health care provider or an emergency room. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week.

• Call the Ohio Department of Health’s public COVID-19 hotline: 833-4-ASK-ODH. The hotline will be open from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., seven days a week.

Prevention tips

• Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds. Do so after coughing, sneezing, blowing your nose, visiting a public place. Use soap and water or sanitizer that is at least 60% alcohol.

• Cover your coughs and sneezes, and wash your hands after.

• Avoid close contact with people who are sick, and avoid people altogether if the virus is spreading in your area.

Symptoms of respiratory illness

COVID-19:

• Fever

• Cough

• Trouble breathing

• Starts about 2 to 14 days after exposure

Influenza:

• Sudden onset

• Fever (sometimes)

• Cough

• Sore throat

• Runny or stuffy nose

• Muscle or body aches

• Headaches

• Fatigue

• Vomiting and diarrhea (mainly in children)

Common cold:

• Slight aches and fatigue

• Sneezing

• Chest discomfort, cough

• Runny or stuffy nose

• Sore throat

Who is considered more at risk?

• Older people.

• People with chronic health conditions like heart disease, lung disease and diabetes.

What if I have symptoms?

• Call your doctor. The medical team will need to ask you questions about your symptoms and travel history. Do not visit the doctor’s office without calling ahead, as the doctor may not want you to come in and potentially expose others.

• Monitor yourself closely, especially if you get worse instead of better. If you are having trouble breathing, have persistent pain or pressure in your chest, have new confusion or have bluish lips or face, call your doctor.

• If you have symptoms and have a regular scheduled doctor appointment, call before going. Put on a mask before entering the office.

• If COVID-19 is suspected, ask your doctor to report your case to the local health department or the Ohio Department of Health.

What if I am sick?

• Stay home. Do not go to work, school or the store. Avoid public areas. Do not use public transportation. Stay away from the public until you’re told by your doctor it’s safe.

• Set up a sick room. Rest in a room separate from others in the household. Use a separate bathroom, if available.

• Limit contact with pets. Keep the family pet out of the sick room, or have someone else do your farm chores. If you must care for your animals, wash your hands before and after and wear a mask. There are no reports of animals becoming sick with COVID-19, but more information is needed.

Should I wear a mask?

• If you are sick, wear a mask to contain your coughs if you must be around others. Put it on before a person caring for you enters the sick room.

• If you are caring for someone who is sick, and that person cannot wear a mask for any reason, you should wear a mask when visiting the sick room. Stay 6 feet away from them, and do not linger.

General household tips

• Do not share dishes, towels or bedding with anyone who is sick.

• Clean and disinfect the things you touch often, like doorknobs, bathroom fixtures and phones. Clean up bodily fluids quickly and thoroughly.

Does it have a season, like flu?

• It is unknown if the beginning of warmer temperatures will have an effect on slowing down the spread of this virus.

The following will not kill/prevent this virus:

• Hot baths, hand dryers, UV lamps, alcohol or chlorine all over your body, pneumonia or flu vaccine, nose saline sprays, eating garlic, antibiotics.

Why is it called COVID-19?

• CO stands for corona, VI for virus and D for disease. The number refers to the year it started.

What businesses are considered essential?

Examples from Allen County Public Health include:

• Stores that sell groceries and medicine

• Food, beverage, licensed marijuana production and agriculture

• Organizations that provide charitable and social services

• Religious entities

• Media

• First amendment protected speech

• Gas stations and businesses needed for transportation

• Financial and insurance institutions

• Hardware and supply stores

• Critical trades

• Mail, post, shipping, logistics, delivery, and pick-up services

• Educational institutions

• Laundry services

• Restaurants for consumption off-premises

• Supplies to work from home

• Supplies for essential businesses and operations

• Transportation

• Home-based care and services

• Residential facilities and shelters

• Professional services

• Manufacture, distribution, supply chain for critical products and industries

• Critical labor union functions

• Hotel and motels

• Funeral services

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Ohio Department of Health, World Health Organization, Allen County Health District

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