Jim Krumel: Getting rid of the fine print


By Jim Krumel - jkrumel@limanews.com



Jim Krumel

Jim Krumel


Admit it.

When using the internet for purchases or signing up for services, you’ve just clicked the “I agree” button, ignoring what’s actually stated in the pages of fine print.

Yeah, it’s dangerous. The take-it-or-leave-it, fine print language that often is inserted into consumer and employment contracts can contain forced arbitration provisions that deny a person the ability to file lawsuits or locks them into expensive situations. Yet, who can really read all that tiny print?

The U.S. House of Representatives finally stated “no more.” On Friday, it passed the Forced Arbitration Injustice Repeal Act (FAIR) making such fine-print demands illegal. It’s not law yet, but it’s a big step in that direction.

Working for $2 an hour

Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company’s refusal to allow members of Congress to tour its plant in San Luis Potosi, Mexico, “makes it easy to draw conclusions about the company’s mistreatment of its workers,” U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown wrote in a letter to company CEO Richard Kramer.

The company reportedly only pays its San Luis Potosí workers $2 an hour, despite Goodyear 2018 sales totaling $15.5 billion. More than 50 workers also were reportedly fired in June when they spoke out against their unjust working conditions.

Brown had lobbied Goodyear to build the San Luis Potosí plant in Ohio, where the company has a long record of success. He also feared that a Mexico-based plant would lead to the shuttering of U.S. facilities due to the significantly lower labor costs across the border. “It seems my fears have been realized,” Brown told Kramer. “Your company recently laid off 170 employees at the Gadsden, Alabama, plant and proposed a buyout at that same facility.”

Other news snippets:

… Family members helplessly watch as 85-year-old Virginia Mosvold floated in the rising ocean waters during Hurricane Dorian. But Mosvold somehow managed to cling to a refrigerator in her Bahamas home and keep her head above water — for three agonizing days. “We said goodbye to her a few times and told her we loved her,” said the woman’s daughter, Sissel Johnson. “It’s by the grace of God that she survived.”

… Drug deaths among Ohio females ages 15 to 44 have increased 93% in the past three years, according to a 2019 report issued by The United Health Foundation.

Jim Krumel
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2019/09/web1_Jim-Krumel-7.jpgJim Krumel

By Jim Krumel

jkrumel@limanews.com

Grapevine is a quick snapshot of items recently in the news. Contact Jim Krumel, editor of The Lima News, at 567-242-0391 or at The Lima News, 3515 Elida Road, Lima, Ohio 45807.

Grapevine is a quick snapshot of items recently in the news. Contact Jim Krumel, editor of The Lima News, at 567-242-0391 or at The Lima News, 3515 Elida Road, Lima, Ohio 45807.

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