D-Day: If not scared, something wrong with you


By REBECCA SANTANA - Associated Press



Eugene Deibler, of Charlotte, North Carolina, worries that what happened on D-Day will be forgotten. “How many people remember the Civil War? How many people will remember World War I? … World War II will fade away also.” AP Photo | Chuck Burton

Eugene Deibler, of Charlotte, North Carolina, worries that what happened on D-Day will be forgotten. “How many people remember the Civil War? How many people will remember World War I? … World War II will fade away also.” AP Photo | Chuck Burton


Historians refer to June 6, 1944 — D-Day — as the turning point of World War II. Today, the number of survivors is dwindling from that defining time in history. A kaleidoscope of their memories, a signal moment of their youth, is being shared by The Lima News and its news services this week.

Climbing into the plane that would take him to Normandy, Eugene Deibler had no idea what to expect. The 19-year-old had joined the paratroopers to avoid being a radio operator, trained for months and survived a broken ankle in jump school, but had yet to see combat.

Gathered at Merryfield Airfield in southwest England, the paratroopers had already gotten geared up to jump the night before, and then the operation was called off due to bad weather. All that pent-up energy had to go someplace, and Deibler remembers troops getting into fights.

The second night, it was a go. Climbing into the plane, Deibler remembers telling himself that if his buddies could do this, so could he.

“If you weren’t scared something was wrong with you,” he said. “Because you’re just a kid, you know?”

As they arrived at the French coast, he remembers heavy antiaircraft fire and tracer bullets from machine guns lighting up the sky like fireworks.

“We said ‘Let’s get the hell out of this plane,’” he said. The jump light went on, and out they went.

On the ground, their job was to secure a series of locks on the Douve River to prevent the Germans from opening the locks and flooding the fields. But they ran into such fierce resistance trying to secure another objective — a set of bridges — that they had to fall back.

Deibler went on to fight across Normandy, Holland and Belgium, in the Battle of Bastogne.

The 75th anniversary is his first time back to Normandy since the invasion, and he’d like to see what’s changed. At his Charlotte, North Carolina, home, the 94-year-old retired dentist has a collection of World War II books. He’s afraid that the great conflict will be forgotten.

“How many people remember the Civil War? How many people will remember World War I? And now it’s the same with World War II,” he said. “World War II will fade away also.”

https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2019/06/web1_D-Day-Horizontal-1.jpg
Eugene Deibler, of Charlotte, North Carolina, worries that what happened on D-Day will be forgotten. “How many people remember the Civil War? How many people will remember World War I? … World War II will fade away also.” AP Photo | Chuck Burton
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2019/06/web1_Eugene-Deibler-2.jpgEugene Deibler, of Charlotte, North Carolina, worries that what happened on D-Day will be forgotten. “How many people remember the Civil War? How many people will remember World War I? … World War II will fade away also.” AP Photo | Chuck Burton

By REBECCA SANTANA

Associated Press

Historians refer to June 6, 1944 — D-Day — as the turning point of World War II. Today, the number of survivors is dwindling from that defining time in history. A kaleidoscope of their memories, a signal moment of their youth, is being shared by The Lima News and its news services this week.

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