Jordan: ‘You might as well fight back’


By Josh Ellerbrock - jellerbrock@limanews.com



Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Urbana, talks to a crowd of local leaders and business owners about his efforts in Washington, D.C.

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Urbana, talks to a crowd of local leaders and business owners about his efforts in Washington, D.C.


Josh Ellerbrock | The Lima News

LIMA — For Rep. Jim Jordan, there’s no room to play nice in politics.

“I always look at — maybe I’m too simple — but, I view it like a wrestling match. Like when you guys compete, he’s trying to beat you,” Jordan said to roughly 30 local residents and business owners during a lunch event held Monday. “Now, the left, as radical as they’ve gotten, you might as well fight back, and I tell you who gets this — I’ve had conversations with him about it — The president gets it. He totally gets it.”

Citizens for Community Values President Aaron Boer said Jordan is a good draw for such events that look to expose local voters, especially Christian conservatives, to their representatives in Washington. In the past 2½ years, Boer estimates he’s helped organize hundreds of similar events throughout Ohio since taking over the leadership position of the Ohio nonprofit.

“It’s little events like these that let people know they’re looking out for them,” Boer said.

CCV is associated with national Christian-values groups such as Focus on the Family, Family Research Council and Alliance Defending Freedom, which often collect funds for conservative political campaigns.

As for the event itself, Jordan spent 15 minutes meeting and greeting before fielding questions from the crowd for another half hour. Questions ranged from how long until Congress defunds Planned Parenthood to Jordan’s potential solutions to Washington’s steadily increasing $22 trillion budget.

The congressman’s answers play well to his audience.

On the budget, Jordan admitted that “some Republicans” and “all Democrats” like to spend tax dollars, and to reign in the national budget, Congress will have to “hold the line” by maintaining discretionary spending while Congress waits for GDP and tax revenue to grow. He also pointed to entitlement programs as in need of some sort of reform, but what that might be will have to wait until after the 2020 election.

“To do that, there will have to be changes. What we’re going to have to say — people who are right at retirement age or close near it — no changes. But if you’re younger, younger people know you have to make changes because they know its not going to be solvent long term,” Jordan said.

Jordan also pointed to healthcare reform as something that will have to be pushed back until after the 2020 presidential election when Jordan said he believes President Donald Trump will be able to win a second term.

Resolving trade disputes with China will also most likely have to wait, Jordan said, until the “new NAFTA” deal, or Trump’s USMCA, is approved by Congress and conservative lawmakers are able to gain some momentum.

Jordan also spent a portion of his time addressing a ruling passed last week by a trio of federal judges in the Southern District of Ohio that claimed Republican lawmakers restricted constitutional rights of Ohio’s voters when they passed the state’s congressional district map.

“We think that’s baloney,” Jordan said. “We have the best system, because our system says this: ‘We the people, in this state of 11 million folks, we the people elect auditor, secretary of state and governor. If you win two of the three, you draw the lines.

“The whole state had the chance to decide who were going to control those three offices. If two Republicans or two Democrats, they draw the lines. You decide. You’re going to take politics out of politics? That’s just crazy. You’re not.”

The next question concerned Jordan’s thoughts on whether Democratic politicians will succeed in nixing the electoral college.

“I hope not,” Jordan said. “But some states are pushing this direction. Democrats want to pack the court again. They want to get rid of the electoral college. They want 16-year-olds to vote. They want public financing of campaigns. That’s why I said earlier, they’re taking some of the most radical positions. So, this is why we have to fight it all. Because you can’t have those things happening or you… well, we’ll see.”

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Urbana, talks to a crowd of local leaders and business owners about his efforts in Washington, D.C.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2019/05/web1_Jordan3.jpgRep. Jim Jordan, R-Urbana, talks to a crowd of local leaders and business owners about his efforts in Washington, D.C. Josh Ellerbrock | The Lima News

By Josh Ellerbrock

jellerbrock@limanews.com

Reach Josh Ellerbrock at 567-242-0398.

Reach Josh Ellerbrock at 567-242-0398.

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