Jim Krumel: First baby of Y2K graduates this week


By Jim Krumel - jkrumel@limanews.com



Jim Krumel

Jim Krumel


Daniel Frederick Fisher, 9 pounds, 10 ounces, was born Jan. 1, 2000, to Michelle and Aaron Fisher of rural Wapakoneta.

Daniel Frederick Fisher, 9 pounds, 10 ounces, was born Jan. 1, 2000, to Michelle and Aaron Fisher of rural Wapakoneta.


Daniel Fisher is one of 12 children of Michelle and Aaron Fisher of rural Wapakoneta. Submitted Photos


Daniel Frederick Fisher took his time coming into this world and his family will always remember him for it.

He was supposed to be born on Christmas Day 1999, but he was a stubborn baby. Instead, he waited a week for New Year’s Day. At 13 minutes after midnight, he arrived a celebrity of sort, becoming the first baby born in Allen County in the year 2000.

Another way to look at is he was the first baby born in Allen County during the 21st Century, or using the buzz word back then, he was Allen County’s first Y2K baby.

You’ll be happy to know that he’s doing just fine today.

Daniel, 19, is from … how should we say this … he’s from a big family … no, a bigger family. He is one of 12 children – ranging in ages 7 to 29 — of Michelle and Aaron Fisher, of rural Wapakoneta. Daniel was Child No. 7 when he was born at St. Rita’s Medical Center.

There are people who work hard, and people who work harder. Daniel enters adulthood in that last category.

He’s graduating from Botkins High School on Sunday and Upper Valley Career Center in Piqua on May 23. He spent his last three years of school working on a dairy farm.

“I did everything and anything,” he said, matter-of-factly. “I worked out in the fields and in the barns taking care of Holsteins.”

If that wasn’t enough, this past year he and a cousin, Adam Fisher, were accepted into Honda’s apprentice program at its Anna engine plant.

“They put you on a school and work rotation,” he explained. “You go to school for two weeks and then you work for two weeks on the line. You learn a lot, but the best part of the program is I have a full-time job starting May 28.”

Daniel has grown up surrounded by technological change.

His generation migrated from Myspace to Facebook; once bugged Mom and Dad for cash, but now prefers their plastic; and had the world’s doors opened to them by a thing called Google.

They were born when people put away their boom boxes and instead used Napster to download the music of Lenny Kravitz, Kid Rock and the Foo Fighters onto their iPods.

A thing called Bluetooth was in the development stages. HD-TV wasn’t on the radar screen yet, nor was Netflix or Movies on Demand.

Being a Y2K baby, Daniel has heard all the stories about the great Y2K scare.

Many people worried computers would stop working at 12 a.m., Jan. 1, 2000, because the machine’s time clocks weren’t programmed for the new millennium. Gone would be the ability to supply energy, control financial markets and run government functions. Some people went as far as stockpiling food, water and ammunition — fearing the world would break out into chaos.

Midnight arrived and nothing happened.

Michelle Fisher admits the Y2K scare was on her mind when she arrived at St. Rita’s at 8:30 that night.

“We expected him to be born much sooner and weren’t trying to become parents of the first baby of the year in 2000,” she said of her 9-pound, 10-ounce son.

St. Rita’s Medical Center was extra busy with 11 babies being born on New Year’s Eve and six more on New Year’s Day. The last baby born in Allen County in 1999 – or should we say the last baby born in the 20th Century, was Nathaniel Coffey, the 8 pound, 15 ounce baby boy of Heather Coffey of Spencerville. He was born at 11:27 p.m.

Today, the technology and information age makes for a wide open world for today’s teens. They go to bed texting and wake up tweeting. They carry iPhones and tablets. They’re inheriting a world of constant change, one that can be both exciting and scary at the same time.

However, if the rest of the graduates are anything like Daniel Fisher, we have nothing to worry about.

ROSES AND THORNS: A first for an OSU-Lima student deserves a spot in the rose garden.

Rose: To Melissa Martinez-Cuen, of Paulding. She was the first person from OSU-Lima to represent all Ohio State graduates as the the student speaker during the commencement ceremony at Ohio Stadium.

Rose: To Bill Timmermeister, who received OSU-Lima’s Violet Meek Town and Gown Award for his many years of service to the community.

Rose: To Bruce Stowe, of Ottawa, who will be painting a mural on the Putnam County Community Thrift Store Building.

Thorn: To Omar Rivera, who led law enforcement agencies on a high speed chase that topped 100 mph hour before driving his motorcycle down a one-way street just blocks from the St. Marys police station when he was caught.

Thorn: To David Smith, of Bath Township. Does he really think Lima should annex his property when it’s filled with broken down vehicles, settling houses and dilapidated structures?

PARTING SHOT: A graduation ceremony is an event where the commencement speaker tells thousands of students dressed in identical caps and gowns that ‘individuality’ is the key to success.

Jim Krumel
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2019/05/web1_Jim-Krumel-1.jpgJim Krumel
Daniel Frederick Fisher, 9 pounds, 10 ounces, was born Jan. 1, 2000, to Michelle and Aaron Fisher of rural Wapakoneta.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2019/05/web1_daniel.baby_.jpegDaniel Frederick Fisher, 9 pounds, 10 ounces, was born Jan. 1, 2000, to Michelle and Aaron Fisher of rural Wapakoneta.
Daniel Fisher is one of 12 children of Michelle and Aaron Fisher of rural Wapakoneta. Submitted Photos
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2019/05/web1_daniel-today.jpgDaniel Fisher is one of 12 children of Michelle and Aaron Fisher of rural Wapakoneta. Submitted Photos

By Jim Krumel

jkrumel@limanews.com

Jim Krumel is the editor of The Lima News. Contact him at 567-242-0391 or at The Lima News, 3515 Elida Road, Lima, Ohio 45807.

Jim Krumel is the editor of The Lima News. Contact him at 567-242-0391 or at The Lima News, 3515 Elida Road, Lima, Ohio 45807.

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