Now is peak time for deer-car crashes


AAA Ohio



If a collision with a deer is unavoidable, the AAA Ohio Auto Club recommends drivers apply the brakes firmly and remain in your lane: Swerving to avoid an animal can often cause a more serious crash or cause you to lose control of your vehicle. What’s more, drivers who swerve to miss a deer and hit something else may be charged for an at-fault accident. AIM Media|File Photo

If a collision with a deer is unavoidable, the AAA Ohio Auto Club recommends drivers apply the brakes firmly and remain in your lane: Swerving to avoid an animal can often cause a more serious crash or cause you to lose control of your vehicle. What’s more, drivers who swerve to miss a deer and hit something else may be charged for an at-fault accident. AIM Media|File Photo


Watch for deer

• Scan the road ahead: Looking ahead helps provide enough reaction time if an animal is spotted. Also, remember some animals, like deer, move in groups, so when there is one, there are usually more in the area.

• Be extra cautious at dawn and dusk: Deer tend to be more active in the early morning and at dusk; especially between 5 a.m. and 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. and 8 p.m.

• If a collision is unavoidable, apply the brakes firmly and remain in your lane: Swerving to avoid an animal can often cause a more serious crash or cause you to lose control of your vehicle. What’s more, drivers who swerve to miss a deer and hit something else may be charged for an at-fault accident.

If you hit a deer:

• Move your vehicle to the side of the road away from the animal.

• Stay away from the deer and wait for the police to arrive.

COLUMBUS — Cooler weather and shorter days mean more deer are now gracing Ohio’s roadways. The number of deer-vehicle collisions peak during the fall, which means drivers need to use caution and remain alert during the months ahead.

“Although deer and other animals are unpredictable, there are actions you can take to help prevent a crash or reduce the damage from an animal collision,” said Ed Conley, of AAA Ohio Auto Club.

While any animal on the road is dangerous, deer are most often the cause of collisions. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, there are more than 1.5 million deer-vehicle collisions each year, resulting in 150 occupant deaths and tens of thousands of injuries.

In 2017, more than 18,000 collisions with deer occurred on Ohio’s roadways, according to the Ohio Department of Public Safety crash statistics. These collisions resulted in seven deaths and 804 injuries.

October through December are peak months for deer-vehicle crashes, due to the clearing of fields and deer mating season. Last year, about 22 percent of Ohio’s deer-vehicle collisions occurred in November, when the Ohio Department of Public Safety recorded nearly 4,000 of these crashes.

Colliding with a deer is also very costly. In 2017, the average insurance claim for a deer-vehicle collision in Ohio was more than $4,400.

If a collision with a deer is unavoidable, the AAA Ohio Auto Club recommends drivers apply the brakes firmly and remain in your lane: Swerving to avoid an animal can often cause a more serious crash or cause you to lose control of your vehicle. What’s more, drivers who swerve to miss a deer and hit something else may be charged for an at-fault accident. AIM Media|File Photo
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2018/10/web1_deer-in-road-2.jpgIf a collision with a deer is unavoidable, the AAA Ohio Auto Club recommends drivers apply the brakes firmly and remain in your lane: Swerving to avoid an animal can often cause a more serious crash or cause you to lose control of your vehicle. What’s more, drivers who swerve to miss a deer and hit something else may be charged for an at-fault accident. AIM Media|File Photo

AAA Ohio

Watch for deer

• Scan the road ahead: Looking ahead helps provide enough reaction time if an animal is spotted. Also, remember some animals, like deer, move in groups, so when there is one, there are usually more in the area.

• Be extra cautious at dawn and dusk: Deer tend to be more active in the early morning and at dusk; especially between 5 a.m. and 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. and 8 p.m.

• If a collision is unavoidable, apply the brakes firmly and remain in your lane: Swerving to avoid an animal can often cause a more serious crash or cause you to lose control of your vehicle. What’s more, drivers who swerve to miss a deer and hit something else may be charged for an at-fault accident.

If you hit a deer:

• Move your vehicle to the side of the road away from the animal.

• Stay away from the deer and wait for the police to arrive.

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