Ottawa still struggling with stray cats


By Bryan Reynolds - breynolds@limanews.com



One of the stray cats who was trapped, neutered and released by Humane Ohio in July 2017 rests in the shade on a hot, humid Thursday morning on South Perry Street. When cats are neutered in this program, a tip of an ear is clipped to mark them.

One of the stray cats who was trapped, neutered and released by Humane Ohio in July 2017 rests in the shade on a hot, humid Thursday morning on South Perry Street. When cats are neutered in this program, a tip of an ear is clipped to mark them.


Bryan Reynolds | The Lima News

A group of stray cats sit in the back yard of a home on South Perry Street in Ottawa. Despite a trapping program, two new litters of kittens have been born and one litter is near maturity. Erin Hughes, deputy clerk-treasurer with Ottawa, said there is money set aside in the budget to pay Humane Ohio to return.

A group of stray cats sit in the back yard of a home on South Perry Street in Ottawa. Despite a trapping program, two new litters of kittens have been born and one litter is near maturity. Erin Hughes, deputy clerk-treasurer with Ottawa, said there is money set aside in the budget to pay Humane Ohio to return.


Bryan Reynolds | The Lima News

OTTAWA — The feral cat population is still causing problems in Ottawa, despite a trapping program.

Last summer, Ottawa council decided to work with Humane Ohio, of Toledo, which is a nonprofit that operates a trap, neuter and return program. These programs help control the population.

Humane Ohio sent representatives to the west side of Ottawa and trapped 27 cats on three separate days in July 2017. The village spent an average of $27 per cat for neutering, medical treatment or euthanization. One cat had to be put down last year. Officials found homes for five kittens for free, said Erin Hughes, deputy clerk-treasurer for Ottawa.

A caretaker, who lives on South Perry Street, feeds and watches the cat population — and reported an increase in cats and activity this year.

There are two litters of kittens on South Perry Street now. Radabaugh said Humane Ohio’s program made an impact last year, but only for a few months.

“On any given day, I walk out here and see four or five cats scatter,” said Eva Jane Radabaugh, who lives on South Perry Street. “They go all over. Up the alley, in my car if I leave a window open, and I see them hanging out under my bird feeder.”

She said her daughter lives across U.S. 224 on South Perry Street and see cats there, too.

Hughes said the village has received sporadic reports of one or two stray cats at other locations around Ottawa but nothing like the colony of cats at South Perry Street and the west side.

So far this year, the village has spent $490 to trap, neuter and return nine cats. Last year Humane Ohio charged by the cat, but this year they charge $100 each time they come out to trap.

Hughes said the Wyandot County Humane Society in Upper Sandusky is a no-kill shelter open to receiving cats from all over Ohio. Residents don’t have to depend on Humane Ohio or the village to solve the problem alone. They can trap any cats on their property themselves and take them to Upper Sandusky or other no-kill shelters, she said.

One of the stray cats who was trapped, neutered and released by Humane Ohio in July 2017 rests in the shade on a hot, humid Thursday morning on South Perry Street. When cats are neutered in this program, a tip of an ear is clipped to mark them.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2018/07/web1_cats2.jpgOne of the stray cats who was trapped, neutered and released by Humane Ohio in July 2017 rests in the shade on a hot, humid Thursday morning on South Perry Street. When cats are neutered in this program, a tip of an ear is clipped to mark them. Bryan Reynolds | The Lima News
A group of stray cats sit in the back yard of a home on South Perry Street in Ottawa. Despite a trapping program, two new litters of kittens have been born and one litter is near maturity. Erin Hughes, deputy clerk-treasurer with Ottawa, said there is money set aside in the budget to pay Humane Ohio to return.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2018/07/web1_cats1.jpgA group of stray cats sit in the back yard of a home on South Perry Street in Ottawa. Despite a trapping program, two new litters of kittens have been born and one litter is near maturity. Erin Hughes, deputy clerk-treasurer with Ottawa, said there is money set aside in the budget to pay Humane Ohio to return. Bryan Reynolds | The Lima News

By Bryan Reynolds

breynolds@limanews.com

Reach Bryan Reynolds at 567-242-0362

Reach Bryan Reynolds at 567-242-0362

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