Rhodes exercise tests readiness


Rhodes State students put pressure on the wounds of a faculty member “injured” in a mock explosion.

By Sam Shriver - sshriver@limanews.com



Health Sciences students at Rhodes State tend to the “injured” during a mock explosion.

Health Sciences students at Rhodes State tend to the “injured” during a mock explosion.


Sam Shriver | The Lima News

LIMA — The sound of an explosion rocked the Keese Hall Multipurpose Center on the Rhodes State College campus Friday afternoon. Luckily it was only a sound effect that simulated the sound if someone had exploded a bomb in the crowded room.

Faculty members acted as if they were injured, and the Rhodes State Health Science students attending the annual Cultural Competency Retreat sprang into action to treat the “injured.”

“It was shocking. I didn’t expect this to happen at all. It’s a good experience we’re getting so we know what to do if something actually happens like this,” said Amber Cross, a physical therapy assistant student at Rhodes State College.

“This is our annual Cultural Competency Retreat which we started almost ten years ago in which all of the different programs within the division of Health Sciences participate in a capstone project, so it’s an all day long retreat. What we do is we focus on a patient in a wiki platform and then the students collaborate and actually develop a treatment program to cover holistically the whole patient,” said Angela Heaton, assistant dean, health sciences/allied health at Rhodes State College.

As part of the Cultural Competency Retreat, the afternoon session consisted of Stop the Bleed training.

“This is a nationwide course that teaches students how to stop any life-threatening hemorrhage and we kind of view it like a CPR class. The more people we can teach to prevent death from life-threatening hemorrhage, the better it is,” said Jeb Sheidler, EMS program coordinator at Rhodes State.

Learning the methods to stop bleeding can go a long way in saving someone’s life.

“The first thing they should do is make sure the scene is safe, so they don’t become a victim. So if the scene is not safe, they should stay in a safe place until it is. If it’s safe, they need to call 9-1-1, get help there then we teach them some basic principles to find the site of bleeding and then stop it,” he said.

So what are some techniques to stop the bleeding?

“Direct pressure is the first thing they do and then we teach them tourniquet use and wound packing, so actually packing gauze into the wound to provide additional compression to stop the bleeding,” he added.

Health Sciences students at Rhodes State tend to the “injured” during a mock explosion.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2018/01/web1_stop-the-bleed-toned.jpgHealth Sciences students at Rhodes State tend to the “injured” during a mock explosion. Sam Shriver | The Lima News
Rhodes State students put pressure on the wounds of a faculty member “injured” in a mock explosion.

By Sam Shriver

sshriver@limanews.com

Reach Sam Shriver at 567-242-0409.

Reach Sam Shriver at 567-242-0409.

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