Local 4H group brings history to life at 19th century walking tour


By John Bush - jbush@limanews.com



Mark Mohr, a historic re-enactor dressed in garb from the 1800s, holds up a wooden jack that people used to use when their horse and buggy broke down. Looking on is Isaac Richard, who is also dressed in traditional clothing from the 19th century.

Mark Mohr, a historic re-enactor dressed in garb from the 1800s, holds up a wooden jack that people used to use when their horse and buggy broke down. Looking on is Isaac Richard, who is also dressed in traditional clothing from the 19th century.


John Bush | The Lima News

LIMA — A local 4H group brought history to life Saturday afternoon during a guided walking tour that showed residents what life was like in the 1800s.

The Johnny Appleseed Gang, a 4H club that is affiliated with the local park district, conducted a series of tours that featured four stations with historic re-enactors dressed in full garb from various periods in the 19th century.

Each station focused on a different aspect of life in the 1800s, including the trials of doctors, military men, homemakers and artists. One re-enactor showed onlookers an 1800s replica canon, and another displayed a horse and buggy that was the main mode of transportation during most of the century. The tour was held at Hermon Woodlands Metro Park in Lima.

“It’s a living history trail,” said Amanda Richard, a volunteer with the Johnny Appleseed Metro Park District. “The idea is you’re in a portal through time, and so you’re looking at a snapshot of history.”

Richard said they decided to focus on the 1800s because that is when Ohio became a state.

“A lot of Ohio’s history didn’t really start taking place a far as settlement and taming the territory until the 1800s, so I think people relate to that a little better than the 1700s and 1600s,” she said.

Richard said that, by bringing history to life in the form of re-enactments and demonstrations, people can gain a better understanding of what life was like back in the early days.

“It makes you appreciate the struggles they had,” she said.

Richard added that it’s sometimes more beneficial to show people history instead of having them read about it in a textbook.

“History is often thought of as boring and dull, but by bringing those people alive and interacting with them, children and adults alike are more likely to remember the struggles of the 1800s versus just reading dates and facts in a book,” she said. “That’s the lovely thing about it.”

Mark Mohr, a historic re-enactor dressed in garb from the 1800s, holds up a wooden jack that people used to use when their horse and buggy broke down. Looking on is Isaac Richard, who is also dressed in traditional clothing from the 19th century.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2017/07/web1_historic-re-enactor.jpgMark Mohr, a historic re-enactor dressed in garb from the 1800s, holds up a wooden jack that people used to use when their horse and buggy broke down. Looking on is Isaac Richard, who is also dressed in traditional clothing from the 19th century. John Bush | The Lima News

By John Bush

jbush@limanews.com

Reach John Bush at 567-242-0456 or on Twitter @Bush_Lima.

Reach John Bush at 567-242-0456 or on Twitter @Bush_Lima.

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