Lima Public Library Book Reviews


LIBRARY OPEN

• Lima Public Library is open to the public six days a week. Hours for the Main Library in Lima are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Our Cairo, Elida and Spencerville branch libraries are open 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Our Lafayette branch is open from 12 noon to 6 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday.

• Curbside pickup is available at the Main Library from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday. Arrangements can be made by calling 567-712-5239, contacting the library through Facebook Messenger, or putting a hold on a book through the online catalog. 24 hour notice is required. Call us when you arrive (park near the main entrance) and your items will be brought to you.

FICTION

The Brides of Maracoor by Gregory Maguire

As the mainland of Maracoor sustains an assault by a foreign navy, the island’s civil-servant overseer struggles to understand how an alien arriving on the shores of Maracoor could threaten the stability and wellbeing of an entire nation. Is it myth or magic at work, for good or for ill?

Bewilderness by Karen Tucker

Irene, a lonely 19-year-old in rural North Carolina, works long nights at the local pool hall, serving pitchers and dodging drunks. One evening, her hilarious, magnetic coworker Luce invites her on a joy ride through the mountains to take revenge on a particularly creepy customer. Their adventure not only spells the beginning of a dazzling friendship, it seduces both girls into the mysterious world of pills and the endless hustles needed to fund the next high.

The Heart Principle by Helen Hoang

When violinist Anna Sun accidentally achieves career success with a viral YouTube video, she finds herself incapacitated and burned out from her attempts to replicate that moment. And when her longtime boyfriend announces he wants an open relationship before making a final commitment, a hurt and angry Anna decides that if he wants an open relationship, then she does, too.

Chasing the Boogeyman by Richard Chizmar

In the summer of 1988, the mutilated bodies of several missing girls begin to turn up in a small Maryland town. The grisly evidence leads police to the terrifying assumption that a serial killer is on the loose in the quiet suburb. But soon a rumor begins to spread that the evil stalking local teens is not entirely human. Law enforcement, as well as members of the FBI, are certain that the killer is a living, breathing madman—and he’s playing games with them.

NONFICTION

Where the Deer and the Antelope Play: The Pastoral Observations of One Ignorant American Who Loves to Walk Outside by Nick Offerman

Nick Offerman has always felt a particular affection for the Land of the Free—not just for the people and their purported ideals but to the actual land itself: the bedrock, the topsoil, and everything in between that generates the health of your local watershed. In his new book, Nick takes a humorous, inspiring, and elucidating trip to America’s trails, farms, and frontier to examine the people who inhabit the land.

The Dressmakers of Auschwitz: The True Story of the Women Who Sewed to Survive by Lucy Adlington

At the height of the Holocaust 25 young inmates of the infamous Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp—mainly Jewish women and girls—were selected to design, cut, and sew beautiful fashions for elite Nazi women in a dedicated salon. It was work that they hoped would spare them from the gas chambers.

The Reckoning: Our Nation’s Trauma and Finding a Way to Heal by Mary L. Trump

How can we make sense of the degree to which our institutions and leaders have let us down? How can we negotiate a world in which all sense of safety and justice seems to have been destroyed? How can we―as individuals and as a nation―confront, process, and overcome this loss of trust and the ways we have been forever altered by chaos, division, and cruelty?

The Redemption of Bobby Love: A Story of Faith, Family, and Justice by Bobby Love

As a Black child in the Jim Crow South, Bobby found himself in legal trouble before his 14th birthday. Sparked by the desperation he felt in the face of limited options and the pull of the streets, Bobby became a master thief. He soon found himself facing a 30-year prison sentence. But Bobby was smarter than his jailers. He escaped, fled to New York, changed his name, and started a new life as “Bobby Love.”

CHILDREN’S

Exquisite: The Poetry and Life of Gwendolyn Brooks by Suzanne Slade

Growing up on the South Side of Chicago in the 1920s, Gwendolyn Brooks didn’t have much money or material things, but her parents gave her the treasures of poetry and music and a household full of love and encouragement for her dreams. Gwendolyn’s dream was to write poetry, and she did. She filled notebook after notebook with her poetry, becoming published in a national magazine when she was only 13. In all she would publish nearly 20 books of poetry and prose. Even when there were only beans for supper and she had to write by candlelight because the electricity had been shut off, Gwendolyn kept writing. In 1950, she became the first black author to win the Pulitzer Prize, literature’s highest award. She spent her life writing, teaching and mentoring young writers, encouraging them to always find the exquisite in ordinary life.

Ages: 8-12

https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2021/10/LimaPublicLibrary.pdf

LIBRARY OPEN

• Lima Public Library is open to the public six days a week. Hours for the Main Library in Lima are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Our Cairo, Elida and Spencerville branch libraries are open 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Our Lafayette branch is open from 12 noon to 6 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday.

• Curbside pickup is available at the Main Library from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday. Arrangements can be made by calling 567-712-5239, contacting the library through Facebook Messenger, or putting a hold on a book through the online catalog. 24 hour notice is required. Call us when you arrive (park near the main entrance) and your items will be brought to you.

Post navigation