Lima Public Library Book Reviews


LIBRARY OPEN

• Lima Public Library is open to the public six days a week. Hours for the Main Library in Lima are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Our Cairo, Elida and Spencerville branch libraries are open 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Our Lafayette branch is open from 12 noon to 6 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday.

• Curbside pickup is available at the Main Library from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday. Arrangements can be made by calling 567-712-5239, contacting the library through Facebook Messenger, or putting a hold on a book through the online catalog. 24 hour notice is required. Call us when you arrive (park near the main entrance) and your items will be brought to you.

FICTION

The Thousand Crimes of Ming Tsu by Tom Lin

Orphaned young, Ming Tsu, the son of Chinese immigrants, is raised by the notorious leader of a California crime syndicate. But when Ming falls in love with Ada, the daughter of a powerful railroad magnate, and the two elope, he seizes the opportunity to escape to a different life. Soon after, in a violent raid, the tycoon’s henchmen kidnap Ada and conscript Ming into service for the Central Pacific Railroad.

New Teeth: Stories by Simon Rich

Two murderous pirates find a child stowaway on board and attempt to balance pillaging with co-parenting. A woman raised by wolves prepares for her parents’ annual Thanksgiving visit. An aging mutant superhero is forced to learn humility when the mayor kicks him upstairs to a desk job. And in the hard-boiled caper “The Big Nap,” a weary 2-year-old detective struggles to make sense of “a world gone mad.”

Popisho by Leone Ross

Somewhere far away ― or maybe right nearby ― lies an archipelago called Popisho. A place of stunning beauty and incorrigible mischief, destiny and mystery, it is also a place in need of change. Everyone in Popisho was born with a little something — something, boy, a little something extra. The local name was cors. Magic, but more than magic. A gift, nah? Yes. From the gods: a thing so inexpressibly your own.

The Portrait of a Mirror by A. Natasha Joukovsky

Wes and Diana are the kind of privileged, well-educated, self-involved New Yorkers you may not want to like but can’t help wanting to like you. Wes would have made any woman weak in the knees — any woman, that is, except perhaps his wife. Brilliant to the point of cunning, Diana possesses her own arsenal of charms, handily deployed against Wes in their constant wars of will and rhetorical sparring.

NONFICTION

Chasing Me to My Grave: An Artist’s Memoir of the Jim Crow South by Winfred Rembert

Winfred Rembert grew up in a family of Georgia field laborers and joined the Civil Rights movement as a teenager. He was arrested after fleeing a demonstration, survived a near-lynching at the hands of law enforcement, and spent seven years on chain gangs. During that time he met the undaunted Patsy, who would become his wife. Years later, at the age of 51 and with Patsy’s encouragement, he started drawing and painting scenes from his youth using leather tooling skills he learned in prison.

Women on Waves: A Cultural History of Surfing: From Ancient Goddesses and Hawaiian Queens to Malibu Movie Stars and Millennial Champions by Jim Kempton

Over the past 200 years, and especially the past five decades, the surfing lifestyle has become the envy of people around the world. The perception of sun, sand, surf, strong young women and their inimitable style, has created a booming lifestyle and sports industry—and the sport that made its Olympic exhibition debut in Tokyo 2021. A massive shift from when colonizers tried to extinguish all traces of Native Hawaiian surfing and its sacred culture.

Slonim Woods 9: A Memoir by Daniel Barban Levin

Daniel Barban Levin was one of the original residents of Slonim Woods 9. Beginning the moment Daniel set foot on Sarah Lawrence’s idyllic campus and spanning the two years he spent in the grip of a megalomaniac, this brave, lyrical, and redemptive memoir reveals how a group of friends were led from college to a cult without the world even noticing.

Shutdown: How Covid Shook the World’s Economy by Adam Tooze

The shocks of 2020 have been great and small, disrupting the world economy, international relations and the daily lives of virtually everyone on the planet. Never before has the entire world economy contracted by 20 percent in a matter of weeks nor in the historic record of modern capitalism has there been a moment in which 95 percent of the world’s economies were suffering all at the same time. Across the world hundreds of millions have lost their jobs.

CHILDREN’S

Lizzie Demands a Seat! by Beth Anderson

New York City, 1854: Elizabeth ‘Lizzie’ Jennings, a 24-year-old African-American teacher and church organist was running late for church and tried to board a streetcar with plenty of empty seats. The conductor blocked her way, saying she’d have to wait for the designated streetcar for ‘her people.’ Lizzie realized that standing up against injustice was more important than making it to church that day and harnessed her bravery. Jennings vs. Third Avenue Railroad Company was the first recorded court decision to grant equal access for all races on public transportation. Lizzie’s lawyer was future U.S. President Chester Arthur, and their victory would pave the way for others like Rosa Parks a century later to continue the fight for equality all across the United States.

Ages: 8-12

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LIBRARY OPEN

• Lima Public Library is open to the public six days a week. Hours for the Main Library in Lima are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Our Cairo, Elida and Spencerville branch libraries are open 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Our Lafayette branch is open from 12 noon to 6 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday.

• Curbside pickup is available at the Main Library from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday. Arrangements can be made by calling 567-712-5239, contacting the library through Facebook Messenger, or putting a hold on a book through the online catalog. 24 hour notice is required. Call us when you arrive (park near the main entrance) and your items will be brought to you.

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