Lima Public Library Book Reviews


LIBRARY OPEN

• The Lima Public Library has reopened. Main library hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Branch hours are noon to 6 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays, except Lafayette is closed Wednesdays.

• The main library has curbside pick up. Hours are 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Call 567-712-5239, contact the library through Facebook Messenger or put a hold on a book through the online catalog. Give workers 24 hours to gather. Park near the main entrance. Call when you arrive, and your items will be brought out.

FICTION

The Other Black Girl by Zakiya Dalila Harris

Twenty-six-year-old editorial assistant Nella Rogers is tired of being the only Black employee at Wagner Books. Fed up with the isolation and microaggressions, she’s thrilled when Harlem-born and bred Hazel starts working in the cubicle beside hers. They’ve only just started comparing natural hair care regimens, though, when a string of uncomfortable events elevates Hazel to Office Darling, and Nella is left in the dust.

Virtue by Hermione Hoby

Arriving in New York City for an internship at an elite but fading magazine, Luca feels invisible: smart but not worldly, privileged but broke, and uncertain how to navigate a new era of social change. Among his peers is Zara, a young Black woman whose sharp wit and frank views on injustice create tension in the office.

Unsettled Ground by Claire Fuller

At 51 years old, twins Jeanie and Julius still live with their mother, Dot, in rural isolation in the English countryside. The cottage they have shared their entire lives is their only protection against the modernizing world around them. Inside its walls, they make music, and in its garden, they grow everything they need to survive. To an outsider, it looks like poverty; to them, it is home.

Mrs. March by Virginia Feito

George March’s latest novel is a smash. No one could be prouder than his dutiful wife, Mrs. March. A careful creature of routine and decorum, she lives a precariously controlled existence on the Upper East Side until one morning, when the shopkeeper of her favorite patisserie suggests that her husband’s latest protagonist―a detestable character named Johanna―is based on Mrs. March herself. Clutching her ostrich leather pocketbook and mint-colored gloves, she flees the shop. What could have merited this humiliation?

NONFICTION

We’re Not Broken: Changing the Autism Conversation by Eric Garcia

Garcia began writing about autism because he was frustrated by the media’s coverage of it; the myths that the disorder is caused by vaccines, the narrow portrayals of autistic people as white men working in Silicon Valley. His own life as an autistic person didn’t look anything like that. Garcia realized he needed to put into writing what so many autistic people have been saying for years; autism is a part of their identity, they don’t need to be fixed.

An American Marriage: The Untold Story of Abraham Lincoln and Mary Todd by Michael Burlingame

Abraham Lincoln was apparently one of those men who regarded “connubial bliss” as an untenable fantasy. During the Civil War, he pardoned a Union soldier who had deserted the army to return home to wed his sweetheart. As the president signed a document sparing the soldier’s life, Lincoln said: “I want to punish the young man—probably in less than a year he will wish I had withheld the pardon.”

Love People, Use Things: Because the Opposite Never Works by Joshua Fields Millburn

Imagine a life with less: less stuff, less clutter, less stress and debt and discontent―a life with fewer distractions. Now, imagine a life with more: more time, more meaningful relationships, more growth and contribution and contentment―a life of passion, unencumbered by the trappings of the chaotic world around you. What you’re imagining is an intentional life. And to get there, you’ll have to let go of some clutter that’s in the way.

Languages of Truth: Essays 2003-2020 by Salman Rushdie

Salman Rushdie is celebrated as a storyteller of the highest order, illuminating truths about our society and culture through his gorgeous, often searing prose. Now, in his latest collection of nonfiction, he brings together insightful and inspiring essays, criticism, and speeches that focus on his relationship with the written word and solidify his place as one of the most original thinkers of our time.

CHILDREN’S

Fur, Feather, Fin, All of Us are Kin by Diane Lang

Humans share this planet with millions of fascinating animals. Some have fur. Some have fins. Some have feathers. Some have scales. Some animals, like the great apes, look very similar to us. Most animals look very different to us. But people and animals have a lot in common, too. We all need food and water and healthy places to live; we all want to feel safe and take care of our babies and teach them how to be successful adults. This book is a guide to animal classification for the very young, but it also encourages readers to think about ways to care for the home we all share, Earth.

Ages: 3-6

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LIBRARY OPEN

• The Lima Public Library has reopened. Main library hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Branch hours are noon to 6 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays, except Lafayette is closed Wednesdays.

• The main library has curbside pick up. Hours are 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Call 567-712-5239, contact the library through Facebook Messenger or put a hold on a book through the online catalog. Give workers 24 hours to gather. Park near the main entrance. Call when you arrive, and your items will be brought out.

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