Lima Public Library Book Reviews


LIBRARY OPEN

• The Lima Public Library has reopened. Main library hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Branch hours are noon to 6 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays, except Lafayette is closed Wednesdays.

• The main library has curbside pick up. Hours are 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Call 567-712-5239, contact the library through Facebook Messenger or put a hold on a book through the online catalog. Give workers 24 hours to gather. Park near the main entrance. Call when you arrive, and your items will be brought out.

FICTION

The Smash-Up by Ali Benjamin

It’s September 2018. In Washington, D.C.,— and in cities and towns across America — women have taken to the streets to protest a Supreme Court nominee. And Ethan Frome’s otherwise quiet life has turned upside down. Ethan’s wife, Zo, is so enraged that she’s transformed their home into a local headquarters for the Resistance. His college roommate and former business partner faces #metoo allegations, sending Ethan into increasingly desperate financial straits.

Sarahland by Sam Cohen

In Sarahland, Sam Cohen brilliantly and often hilariously explores the ways in which traditional stories have failed us, both demanding and thrillingly providing for its cast of Sarahs new origin stories, new ways to love the planet and those inhabiting it, and new possibilities for life itself.

Doors of Sleep: Journals of Zaxony Delatree by Tim Pratt

Every time Zax Delatree falls asleep, he travels to a new reality. He has no control over his destination and never knows what he will see when he opens his eyes. All he has to live by are his wits and the small aides he has picked up along the way — technological advantages from techno-utopias, sedatives to escape dangerous worlds, and stimulants to extend his stay in pleasant ones.

Landslide by Susan Conley

After a fishing accident leaves her husband hospitalized across the border in Canada, Jill is left to look after her teenage boys —“the wolves”— alone. With remarkable poise and startling beauty, Conley ushers us into a modern household where, for a family at odds, Instagram posts, sex-positivity talks, and old fishing tales mingle to become a kind of love language.

NONFICTION

The Horde: How the Mongols Changed the World by Marie Favereau

The Mongols are widely known for one thing: conquest. In the first comprehensive history of the Horde, the western portion of the Mongol empire that arose after the death of Chinggis Khan, Marie Favereau shows that the accomplishments of the Mongols extended far beyond war. For three hundred years, the Horde was no less a force in global development than Rome had been. It left behind a profound legacy in Europe, Russia, Central Asia, and the Middle East, palpable to this day.

Laundry Love: Finding Joy in a Common Chore by Patric Richardson and Karin B. Miller

Sorting your laundry? It’s not all about whites and darks. Pondering the wash cycles? Every load, even your delicates, should be washed using express or quick-wash on warm. Facing expensive dry cleaning bills? You’ll learn how to wash everything — yes everything — at home. And those basically clean but smelly clothes? Richardson has a secret for freshening those too (hint: it involves vodka, not soap).

American Cider: A Modern Guide to a Historic Beverage by Dan Pucci and Craig Cavallo

Cider today runs the gamut from sweet to dry, smooth to funky, made from apples and sometimes joined by other fruits—and even hopped like beer. Like wine made from well-known grapes, ciders differ based on the apples they’re made from and where and how those apples were grown. Combining the tasting tools of wine and beer, the authors illuminate the possibilities of this light, flavorful, naturally gluten-free beverage.

Beloved Beasts: Fighting for Life in an Age of Extinction by Michelle Nijhuis

In the late nineteenth century, as humans came to realize that our rapidly industrializing and globalizing societies were driving other animal species to extinction, a movement to protect and conserve them was born. Acclaimed science journalist Michelle Nijhuis traces the movement’s history: from early battles to save charismatic species such as the American bison and bald eagle to today’s global effort to defend life on a larger scale.

CHILDREN’S

The Secret Spiral of Swamp Kid by Kirk Scroggs

My name is Russell Weinwright and if you think you have problems in middle school, try being half kid and half swamp creature — who is terrible at sports. It’s not easy at all, I eat sunlight for lunch, got weeds for hair, and there might be a frog living in my tree trunk arm. I do have two best friends, Charlotte and Preston who keep me sane. Lately I have had men in black spying on me, my science teacher might be an evil mastermind, and more. Find out more by reading my notebook, if you dare!

Ages: 8-12

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LIBRARY OPEN

• The Lima Public Library has reopened. Main library hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Branch hours are noon to 6 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays, except Lafayette is closed Wednesdays.

• The main library has curbside pick up. Hours are 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Call 567-712-5239, contact the library through Facebook Messenger or put a hold on a book through the online catalog. Give workers 24 hours to gather. Park near the main entrance. Call when you arrive, and your items will be brought out.

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