Lima Public Library Book Reviews


LIBRARY OPEN

• The Lima Public Library has reopened. Main library hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Branch hours are noon to 6 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays, except Lafayette is closed Wednesdays.

• The main library has curbside pick up. Hours are 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Call 567-712-5239, contact the library through Facebook Messenger or put a hold on a book through the online catalog. Give workers 24 hours to gather. Park near the main entrance. Call when you arrive, and your items will be brought out.

Fiction

The Rain Heron by Robbie Arnott

Ren lives alone on the remote frontier of a country devastated by a coup d’état. High on the forested slopes, she survives by hunting, farming, trading and forgetting the contours of what was once a normal life. But her quiet stability is disrupted when an army unit, led by a young female soldier, comes to the mountains on government orders in search of a legendary creature called the rain heron.

The Unwilling by John Hart

Gibby’s older brothers have already been to war. One died there. The other came back misunderstood and hard, a decorated killer now freshly released from a three-year stint in prison. Jason won’t speak of the war or of his time behind bars, but he wants a relationship with the younger brother he hasn’t known for years. Determined to make that connection, he coaxes Gibby into a day at the lake: long hours of sunshine and whisky and older women.

The Dress Shop on King Street by Ashley Clark

Harper Dupree has pinned all her hopes on a future in fashion design. But when it comes crashing down around her, she returns home to Fairhope, Alabama, and to Millie, the woman who first taught her how to sew. As Harper rethinks her own future, long-hidden secrets about Millie’s past are brought to light. Now, together, Harper and Millie return to Charleston to find the man who may hold the answers they seek, and a chance at the dress shop they’ve both dreamed of.

The Fortunate Ones by Ed Tarkington

When Charlie Boykin was young, he thought his life with his single mother on the working-class side of Nashville was perfectly fine. But when his mother arranges for him to be admitted as a scholarship student to an elite private school, he is suddenly introduced to what the world can feel like to someone cushioned by money. That world, he discovers, is an almost irresistible place where one can bend — and break — rules and still end up untarnished.

Non-fiction

Appalachian Fall: Dispatches from Coal Country on What’s Ailing America by Jeff Young

Despite fueling a century of American progress, the people at the heart of coal country are being left behind, suffering from unemployment, the opioid epidemic and environmental crises often at greater rates than anywhere else in the country. But what if Appalachia’s troubles are just a taste of what the future holds for all of us?

Mediocre: The Dangerous Legacy of White Male America by Ijeoma Oluo

What happens to a country that tells generation after generation of white men that they deserve power? What happens when success is defined by status over women and people of color, instead of by actual accomplishments? Through the last 150 years of American history — from the post-reconstruction South and the mythic stories of cowboys in the West— Ijeoma Oluo exposes the devastating consequences of white male supremacy on women, people of color and white men themselves.

The Scaffold Effect: Raising Resilient, Self-Reliant, and Secure Kids in an Age of Anxiety by Harold S. Koplewicz

Just as sturdy scaffolding is necessary when erecting a building and will come down when the structure grows stable, good parenting provides children with steady and warm emotional nourishment on the path toward independence. Never-ending parental problem-solving and involvement can have the opposite effect, enabling fragility and anxiety over time.

The Deepest South of All: True Stories from Natchez, Mississippi by Richard Grant

Natchez, Mississippi, once had more millionaires per capita than anywhere else in America, and its wealth was built on slavery and cotton. Today it has the greatest concentration of antebellum mansions in the South, and a culture full of unexpected contradictions. Prominent white families dress up in hoopskirts and Confederate uniforms for ritual celebrations of the Old South, yet Natchez is also progressive enough to elect a gay black man for mayor with 91% of the vote.

Children’s

The Chicken Who Couldn’t By: Jan Thomas

Chicken has been to the county fair with his farmer and he didn’t even win a ribbon. Now, he is on his way back to the farm, when the truck hits a bump and knocks him right out of the truck leaving him behind. Can he make it back home without running into the sly fox? Will he be safe along the way? Read to find out.

Ages: Preschool-8 years

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LIBRARY OPEN

• The Lima Public Library has reopened. Main library hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Branch hours are noon to 6 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays, except Lafayette is closed Wednesdays.

• The main library has curbside pick up. Hours are 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Call 567-712-5239, contact the library through Facebook Messenger or put a hold on a book through the online catalog. Give workers 24 hours to gather. Park near the main entrance. Call when you arrive, and your items will be brought out.

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