Lima Public Library Book Reviews


LIBRARY OPEN

• The Lima Public Library has reopened. Main library hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Branch hours are noon to 6 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays, except Lafayette is closed Wednesdays.

• The main library has curbside pick up. Hours are 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Call 567-712-5239, contact the library through Facebook Messenger or put a hold on a book through the online catalog. Give workers 24 hours to gather. Park near the main entrance. Call when you arrive, and your items will be brought out.

Fiction

What You Said to Me by Olivia Newport

When 15-year-old Tisha Crowder gets caught shoplifting, attorney Nolan Duffy tries to protect her from consequences that could rattle her already troubled life. His daughter, Jillian, feels like she’s the one being punished instead — by having Tisha assigned to work with her on a backlog of genealogy files. Besides, everyone in Canyon Mines knows the Crowder family has experienced generations of brokenness.

The Jetsetters by Amanda Eyre Ward

When 70-year-old Charlotte Perkins submits a sexy essay to a contest, she dreams of reuniting estranged children: Lee, an almost-famous actress; Cord, a handsome Manhattan venture capitalist; and Regan, a harried mother who took it all wrong when Charlotte bought her a Weight Watchers gift certificate for her birthday. Charlotte yearns for the years when her children were young, when she was a single mother who meant everything to them.

The Collected Breece D’J Pancake: Stories, Fragments, Letters by Breece D’J Pancake

Breece D’J Pancake published only a handful of stories before he took his own life in 1979, just shy of his 27th birthday. Recognized at the time as “an American Dubliners” (Jayne Anne Phillips) and a collection by a “young writer of such extraordinary gifts that one is tempted to compare his debut to Hemingway’s” (Joyce Carol Oates). Kurt Vonnegut called him “merely the best writer, the most sincere writer I’ve ever read.”

The Burning God by R.F. Kuang

After saving her nation of Nikan from foreign invaders and battling the evil Empress Su Daji in a brutal civil war, Fang Runin was betrayed by allies and left for dead. Despite her losses, Rin hasn’t given up on those for whom she has sacrificed so much — the people of the southern provinces and especially Tikany, the village that is her home. Returning to her roots, Rin meets difficult challenges — and unexpected opportunities.

Non-Fiction

Jew(ish): A primer, A memoir, A manual, A plea by Matt Greene

When his son was born to a non-Jewish mother, Matt began to consider the upbringing he’d put behind him — the sense of not belonging, the forbidden foods, the holidays that felt more like punishments. There are more types of Jew than there are bagel fillings, and for every two there are three opinions. But if you’re not a black-hatted frummer, if you’re allergic to groups, if you observe but don’t believe, or you don’t observe at all, does that make you less Jewish?

Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World by Fareed Zakaria

Lenin once said, “There are decades when nothing happens and weeks when decades happen.” This is one of those times when history has sped up. CNN host and best-selling author Fareed Zakaria helps readers to understand the nature of a post-pandemic world: the political, social, technological, and economic consequences that may take years to unfold.

This Time Next Year We’ll Be Laughing by Jacqueline Winspear

After 16 novels, Jacqueline Winspear has taken the bold step of turning to memoir, revealing the hardships and joys of her family history. Both shockingly frank and deftly restrained, her story tackles the difficult, poignant and fascinating family accounts of her paternal grandfather’s shellshock; her mother’s evacuation from London during the Blitz; and Winspear’s own childhood picking hops and fruit on farms in rural Kent.

Metropolis: A History of the City, Humankind’s Greatest Invention by Ben Wilson

In the 200 millennia of our existence, nothing has shaped us more profoundly than the city. Here is the grand, glorious story of how city living has allowed human culture to flourish. Beginning with Uruk, the world’s first city, Wilson shows us that cities were never a necessity but that once they existed their density created such a blossoming of human endeavor — producing new professions, forms of art, worship, and trade — that they kick-started nothing less than civilization.

Children’s

Attack of the Underwear Dragon By: Scott Rothman

This is the story of a knight named Sir Percival and his wonderfully talented assistant Cole. Cole wishes he could become a knight, but instead his days are spent assisting Sir Percival with his boo-boo’s. One day a dragon enters the kingdom and Sir Percival is frightened tremendously. He is a great knight, except when dragons are around. How can Sir Percival save the village now? After the inevitable happens and every knight is injured leaving only Cole left to try and save the village? But will Cole be able to step up and help?

Ages: Preschool-2nd grade

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LIBRARY OPEN

• The Lima Public Library has reopened. Main library hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Branch hours are noon to 6 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays, except Lafayette is closed Wednesdays.

• The main library has curbside pick up. Hours are 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Call 567-712-5239, contact the library through Facebook Messenger or put a hold on a book through the online catalog. Give workers 24 hours to gather. Park near the main entrance. Call when you arrive, and your items will be brought out.

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