Lima Public Library Book Reviews


LIBRARY OPEN

• The Lima Public Library has reopened. Main library hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Branch hours are noon to 6 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays, except Lafayette is closed Wednesdays.

• The main library has curbside pick up. Hours are 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Call 567-712-5239, contact the library through Facebook Messenger or put a hold on a book through the online catalog. Give workers 24 hours to gather. Park near the main entrance. Call when you arrive, and your items will be brought out.

Fiction

Bring Me the Head of Quentin Tarantino by Julián Herbert

Here we become acquainted with a vengeful “personal memories coach” who tries to get even with his delinquent clients; a former journalist with a cocaine habit who travels through northern Mexico impersonating a famous author of Westerns; the ghost of Juan Rulfo; a man who discovers music in his teeth; and, in the deliriously pulpy title story, a drug lord who looks just like Quentin Tarantino.

Aphasia by Mauro Javier Cárdenas

Antonio wants to avoid thinking about his sister because she is on the run after allegedly threatening to shoot her neighbors and has been claiming that Antonio, Obama, the Pentagon and their mother are all conspiring against her. Antonio worries that what’s been happening to his sister might somehow infect his relatively contented, ordered American life and destabilize the precarious arrangement with his ex-wife that’s allowed him to stay close to his two daughters.

The Thirty Names of Night by Zeyn Joukhadar

Five years after a suspicious fire killed his ornithologist mother, a closeted Syrian American trans boy sheds his birth name and searches for a new one. As his grandmother’s sole caretaker, he spends his days cooped up in their apartment, avoiding his neighborhood masjid, his estranged sister and even his best friend (who also happens to be his longtime crush). The only time he feels truly free is when he slips out at night to paint murals on buildings in the once-thriving Manhattan neighborhood known as Little Syria.

The Lost Writings by Franz Kafka

Selected by the preeminent Kafka biographer and scholar Reiner Stach and newly translated by the peerless Michael Hofmann, the 74 pieces gathered here have been lost to sight for decades and two of them have never been translated into English before. Some stories are several pages long; some run about a page; a handful are only a few lines long: all are marvels. Even the most fragmentary texts are revelations.

Non-Fiction

I Want to Be Where the Normal People Are by Rachel Bloom

In a collection of laugh-out-loud funny essays, all told in the unique voice (sometimes singing voice) that made her a star; Rachel writes about everything from her love of Disney, OCD and depression, weirdness and Spanx to the story of how she didn’t poop in the toilet until she was 4 years old; Rachel’s pieces are hilarious, smart, and infinitely relatable (except for the pooping thing).

Don’t Tell Me to Relax: Emotional Resilience in the Age of Rage, Feels, and Freak-Outs by Ralph De La Rosa

From politics, climate change and the economy to racism, sexism and a hundred other kinds of biases — things have never felt so urgent and uncertain. We want to take action, but so many of us struggle with overwhelm and burnout. And on top of it all, we get so many messages telling us to relax, to “let it go” and feel some other way about things. We’d like to think that emotional intelligence and mindfulness will help — but why do these approaches so often fall short in fever-pitch moments?

We Keep the Dead Close: A Murder at Harvard and a Half Century of Silence by Becky Cooper

1969: the height of counterculture and the year universities would seek to curb the unruly spectacle of student protest; the winter that Harvard University would begin the tumultuous process of merging with Radcliffe, its all-female sister school; and the year that Jane Britton, an ambitious 23-year-old graduate student in Harvard’s Anthropology Department and daughter of Radcliffe Vice President J. Boyd Britton, would be found bludgeoned to death in her Cambridge, Massachusetts apartment.

Magic: A History: From Alchemy to Witchcraft, from the Ice Age to the Present by Chris Gosden

Three great strands of belief run through human history: Religion is the relationship with one god or many gods, masters of our lives and destinies. Science distances us from the world, turning us into observers and collectors of knowledge. And magic is direct human participation in the universe: we have influence on the world around us, and the world has influence on us.

Children’s

Bunheads by Misty Copeland

From prima ballerina Misty Copeland, the first African-American principal dancer of the American Ballet Theatre comes a story to inspire the next generation of ballerinas — or “bunheads” as they are known in the dance world. We join a young and nervous Misty in her very first dance class. She is captivated by the ballet “Coppelia” — the tale about a toymaker who brings a doll to life and dreams of dancing the role of the heroine, Swanilda. But she’s only a beginner, and she’s got a lot of work to do. With the help of her classmates, she is encouraged to do her very best and put on a show to remember.

Ages: 4-8

https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2020/12/web1_LimaPublicLibrary-1.jpg

LIBRARY OPEN

• The Lima Public Library has reopened. Main library hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Branch hours are noon to 6 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays, except Lafayette is closed Wednesdays.

• The main library has curbside pick up. Hours are 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Call 567-712-5239, contact the library through Facebook Messenger or put a hold on a book through the online catalog. Give workers 24 hours to gather. Park near the main entrance. Call when you arrive, and your items will be brought out.

Post navigation