Lima Public Library Book Reviews


LIBRARY OPEN

• The Lima Public Library has reopened. Main library hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Branch hours are noon to 6 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays, except Lafayette is closed Wednesdays.

• The main library has curbside pick up. Hours are 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Call 567-712-5239, contact the library through Facebook Messenger or put a hold on a book through the online catalog. Give workers 24 hours to gather. Park near the main entrance. Call when you arrive, and your items will be brought out.

Fiction

Stories from Suffragette City by M.J. Rose

Stories from Suffragette City is a collection of short stories that all take place on a single day: Oct. 23, 1915. It’s the day when tens of thousands of women marched up Fifth Avenue, demanding the right to vote in New York City. Thirteen of today’s bestselling authors have taken this moment as inspiration to raise the voices of history and breathe fresh life into their struggles and triumphs.

The Boy in the Field by Margot Livesey

One September afternoon in 1999, teenagers Matthew, Zoe and Duncan Lang are walking home from school when they discover a boy lying in a field, bloody and unconscious. Thanks to their intervention, the boy’s life is saved. In the aftermath, all three siblings are irrevocably changed. Over the course of the autumn, they find themselves at once drawn together and driven apart.

The Cat and The City by Nick Bradley

In Tokyo, one of the world’s largest megacities, a stray cat is wending her way through the back alleys. With each detour she brushes up against the seemingly disparate lives of the city-dwellers, connecting them in unexpected ways. But the city is changing. As it does, it pushes her to the margins where she chances upon a series of apparent strangers, from a homeless man squatting in an abandoned hotel to a shut-in hermit afraid to leave his house to a convenience store worker searching for love.

Discomfort of Evening by Marieke Lucas Rijneveld

Ten-year-old Jas lives with her strictly religious parents and her siblings on a dairy farm where waste and frivolity are akin to sin. Despite the dreary routine of their days, Jas has a unique way of experiencing her world. One icy morning, the disciplined rhythm of her family’s life is ruptured by a tragic accident. As her parents’ suffering makes them increasingly distant, Jas and her siblings develop a curiosity about death that leads them into disturbing rituals and fantasies.

Non-Fiction

Entitled: How Male Privilege Hurts Women by Kate Manne

In this bold and stylish critique, Cornell philosopher Kate Manne offers a radical new framework for understanding misogyny. Ranging widely across the culture, from Harvey Weinstein and the Brett Kavanaugh hearings to “Cat Person” and the political misfortunes of Elizabeth Warren, Manne’s book shows how privileged men’s sense of entitlement — to sex, yes, but more insidiously to admiration, care, bodily autonomy, knowledge and power — is a pervasive social problem with often devastating consequences.

You’re the Only One I’ve Told: The Stories Behind Abortion by Meera Shah

For a long time, when people asked Dr. Meera Shah what she did, she would tell them she was a doctor and leave it at that. But over the last few years, Shah decided it was time to be direct. “I’m an abortion provider,” she will now say. And an interesting thing started to happen each time she met someone new. One by one, people would confide — at barbecues, at jury duty, in the middle of the greeting card aisle at Target — that in fact they’d had an abortion themselves. And the refrain was often the same: You’re the only one I’ve told.

A Furious Sky: The Five-Hundred-Year History of America’s Hurricanes by Eric Jay Dolin

Hurricanes menace North America from June through November every year, each as powerful as 10,000 nuclear bombs. These megastorms will likely become more intense as the planet continues to warm, yet we too often treat them as local disasters and TV spectacles, unaware of how far-ranging their impact can be. We must look to our nation’s past if we hope to comprehend the consequences of the hurricanes of the future.

Putin’s People: How the KGB Took Back Russia and Then Took On the West by Catherine Belton

Interference in American elections. The sponsorship of extremist politics in Europe. War in Ukraine. In recent years, Vladimir Putin’s Russia has waged a concerted campaign to expand its influence and undermine Western institutions. But how and why did all this come about, and who has orchestrated it? Here is the untold story of how Vladimir Putin and the small group of KGB men surrounding him rose to power and looted their country.

Children’s

Little Libraries, Big Heroes by Miranda Paul

In 2009 a man named Todd Bol was renovating his garage in Wisconsin when he ripped off its old wooden door. He liked the wood, though, and didn’t want to throw it out. After thinking about how he could repurpose it, he came up with a unique idea. In honor of his mother, who had been a schoolteacher, Todd built a little replica of a schoolhouse and filled it with books. He planted it in his front yard as a book exchange for his neighborhood. With his friend Rick’s help, Todd built even more tiny libraries so more neighborhoods could have one. Since then, more than 75,000 Little Free Library boxes have popped up in all 50 states and in 88 countries around the world. Is there one in your neighborhood?

Ages: 6-10

https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2020/11/web1_LimaPublicLibrary.jpg

LIBRARY OPEN

• The Lima Public Library has reopened. Main library hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Branch hours are noon to 6 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays, except Lafayette is closed Wednesdays.

• The main library has curbside pick up. Hours are 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Call 567-712-5239, contact the library through Facebook Messenger or put a hold on a book through the online catalog. Give workers 24 hours to gather. Park near the main entrance. Call when you arrive, and your items will be brought out.

Post navigation