Lima Public Library Book Reviews


LIBRARY OPEN

• The Lima Public Library has reopened. Main library hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Branch hours are noon to 6 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays, except Lafayette is closed Wednesdays.

• The main library has curbside pick up. Hours are 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Call 567-712-5239, contact the library through Facebook Messenger or put a hold on a book through the online catalog. Give workers 24 hours to gather. Park near the main entrance. Call when you arrive, and your items will be brought out.

Fiction

The Prisoner’s Wife by Maggie Brookes

In the dead of night, a Czech farm girl and a British soldier travel through the countryside. Izabela and prisoner of war Bill have secretly married and are on the run, with Izzy dressed as a man. The young husband and wife evade capture for as long as possible — until they are cornered by Nazi soldiers with tracking dogs. Izzy’s disguise works. The couple are assumed to be escaped British soldiers and transported to a POW camp. However, their ordeal has just begun.

Hurricane Season by Fernanda Melchor

The Witch is dead. And the discovery of her corpse ― by a group of children playing near the irrigation canals ― propels the whole village into an investigation. Rumors and suspicions spread. As the novel unfolds in a dazzling linguistic torrent, with each unreliable narrator lingering on new details, new acts of depravity or brutality, Melchor extracts some tiny shred of humanity from these characters that most would write off as utterly irredeemable, forming a lasting portrait of a damned Mexican village.

The Jane Austen Society by Natalie Jenner

One hundred and fifty years ago, Chawton was the final home of Jane Austen, one of England’s finest novelists. Now it’s home to a few distant relatives and their diminishing estate. With the last bit of Austen’s legacy threatened, a group of disparate individuals come together to preserve both Jane Austen’s home and her legacy.

I, John Kennedy Toole by Kent Carroll

This the novelized true story of the funny, tragic, riveting narrative behind the making of an American masterpiece. The novel traces Toole’s life in New Orleans through his adolescence, his stay at Columbia University in New York, his attempts to escape the burden of his demanding mother and his weak father, his retreat into a world of his own creation, and finally the invention of astonishing characters that came to living reality for both readers (and the author himself) in his prize-winning A Confederacy of Dunces.

Non-Fiction

The Genius Life: Heal Your Mind, Strengthen Your Body, and Become Extraordinary by Max Lugavere

The human body was honed under conditions that no longer exist. The modern world has changed dramatically since our days as hunter gatherers, and it has caused widespread anxiety, stress, and disease, leaving our brains in despair. But science proves that the body and brain can be healed with the intervention of lifestyle protocols that help us to regain our cognitive birthright.

Notes from an Apocalypse: A Personal Journey to the End of the World and Back by Mark O’Connell

We’re alive in a time of worst-case scenarios: The weather has gone uncanny. Old postwar alliances are crumbling. A pandemic draws our global community to a halt. Everywhere you look there’s an omen. How is a person supposed to live in the shadow of such a grim future? What does it mean to have children — nothing if not an act of hope — in such unsettled times? What might it be like to live through the worst? And what on Earth is anybody doing about it?

Craigslist Confessional: A Collection of Secrets from Anonymous Strangers by Helena Dea Bala

Helena Dea Bala was an exhausted and isolated DC lobbyist, when she decided to split her lunch with a man who often panhandled near her office. They chatted effortlessly as they ate; there were no half-truths or white lies, and no fear of judgment. Helena felt connected and unburdened in a way she hadn’t in years. Inspired, she posted an ad on Craigslist promising to listen, anonymously and for free, to whatever the speaker felt he or she couldn’t tell anyone else. Emails from people desperate to connect flooded her inbox, and she listened.

Good Boy: My Life in Seven Dogs by Jennifer Finney Boylan

Here is a universal account of a remarkable story: showing how a young boy became a middle-aged woman ― accompanied at seven crucial moments of growth and transformation by seven memorable dogs. “Everything I know about love,” she writes, “I learned from dogs.” Their love enables us to pull off what seem like impossible feats: to find our way home when we are lost, to live our lives with humor and courage, and above all, to best become our true selves.

Children’s

Doggie Data series by World Book

Books about man’s best friend are one of the top requests at the library. This series offers engaging looks at various dog breeds, packed with great photos and information about their features, their personalities and how to care for the specific needs of each type of dog. Whether you are looking to add a new canine member to your family or you just love dogs in general, you won’t be barking up the wrong tree to check out these books! Eight of America’s top breeds are featured: Beagles, Boxers, Bulldogs, Chihuahuas, German Shepherds, Labrador Retrievers, Poodles and Pugs.

Ages: 7 – 10

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LIBRARY OPEN

• The Lima Public Library has reopened. Main library hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Branch hours are noon to 6 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays, except Lafayette is closed Wednesdays.

• The main library has curbside pick up. Hours are 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Call 567-712-5239, contact the library through Facebook Messenger or put a hold on a book through the online catalog. Give workers 24 hours to gather. Park near the main entrance. Call when you arrive, and your items will be brought out.

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