Lima Public Library Book Reviews


LIBRARY ONLINE

• Although the Lima Public Library is temporarily closed, you can still access lots of books, videos and other resources with your library card at www.limalibrary.com/digital.

• The main library has curbside pick up. Hours are 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Call 567-712-5239, contact the library through Facebook Messenger or put a hold on a book through the online catalog. Give workers 24 hours to gather. Park near the main entrance. Call when you arrive, and your items will be brought out.

Fiction

The Book of Longings by Sue Monk Kidd

Raised in a wealthy family with ties to the ruler of Galilee, Ana is rebellious and ambitious, with a brilliant mind and a daring spirit. She engages in furtive scholarly pursuits and writes narratives about neglected and silenced women. Ana is expected to marry an older widower, a prospect that horrifies her. An encounter with 18-year-old Jesus changes everything.

How Much of These Hills Is Gold by C Pam Zhang

Newly orphaned children of immigrants, Lucy and Sam are suddenly alone in a land that refutes their existence. Fleeing the threats of their western mining town, they set off to bury their father in the only way that will set them free from their past. Along the way, they encounter giant buffalo bones, tiger paw prints and the specters of a ravaged landscape as well as family secrets, sibling rivalry and glimpses of a different kind of future.

Little Family by Ishmael Beah

Hidden away from a harsh outside world, five young people have improvised a home in an abandoned airplane, a relic of their country’s tumultuous past. Elimane, the bookworm, is as street-smart as he is wise. Clever Khoudiemata maneuvers to keep the younger kids safe and fed. But when Khoudi comes under the spell of the “beautiful people” — the fortunate sons and daughters of the elite — the desire to resume an interrupted coming of age and follow her own destiny proves impossible to resist.

142 Ostriches by April Davila

When Tallulah Jones was 13, her grandmother plucked her from the dank Oakland apartment she shared with her unreliable mom and brought her to the family ostrich ranch in the Mojave Desert. After 11 years caring for the curious, graceful birds, Tallulah accepts a job in Montana and prepares to leave home. But when Grandma Helen dies under strange circumstances, Tallulah inherits everything — just days before the birds inexplicably stop laying eggs.

Non-Fiction

The Lost Family: How DNA Testing Is Upending Who We Are by Libby Copeland

You swab your cheek or spit into a vial, then send it away to a lab somewhere. Weeks later you get a report that might tell you where your ancestors came from or if you carry certain genetic risks. Or the report could reveal a long-buried family secret and upend your entire sense of identity. Soon a lark becomes an obsession, an incessant desire to find answers to questions at the core of your being, like “Who am I?” and “Where did I come from?” Welcome to the age of home genetic testing.

Lady in Waiting: My Extraordinary Life in the Shadow of the Crown by Anne Glenconner

Anne Glenconner has been at the center of the royal circle from childhood, when she met and befriended the future Queen Elizabeth II and her sister, the Princess Margaret. Though the firstborn child of the 5th Earl of Leicester, who controlled one of the largest estates in England, as a daughter she was deemed “the greatest disappointment” and unable to inherit. Since then she has needed all her resilience to survive court life with her sense of humor intact.

Heaven and Hell: A History of the Afterlife by Bart D. Ehrman

What happens when we die? A recent Pew Research poll showed that 72% of Americans believe in a literal heaven, 58% in a literal hell. Most people who hold these beliefs are Christian and assume they are the age-old teachings of the Bible. But eternal rewards and punishments are found nowhere in the Old Testament and are not what Jesus or his disciples taught. So where did the ideas come from?

The Future of Feeling: Building Empathy in a Tech-Obsessed World by Kaitlin Ugolik Phillips

There’s no doubt that technology has made it easier to communicate. It’s also easier to shut someone out when we are confronted with online discourse. Why bother to understand strangers — or even acquaintances — when you can troll them, block them or just click “Unfriend” and never look back? However briefly satisfying that might be, it’s also potentially eroding one of our most human traits: empathy.

Children’s

Adorable Animals series by World Book

Get ready for cuteness overload! Gorgeous, playful photos of various baby animals around the world will captivate young animal lovers. Each short and zippy volume covers the baby animal’s special appearance, personality, diet, habitat and family life in the wild. Baby animals encounter new and sometimes scary experiences every day. Growing up in the animal kingdom isn’t always easy, but just like their human counterparts, these babies are all adorable! Featured babies are: Elephants, Skunks, Foxes, Gorillas, Penguins, Polar Bears, Squirrels and Zebras.

Ages: 7 - 10

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LIBRARY ONLINE

• Although the Lima Public Library is temporarily closed, you can still access lots of books, videos and other resources with your library card at www.limalibrary.com/digital.

• The main library has curbside pick up. Hours are 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Call 567-712-5239, contact the library through Facebook Messenger or put a hold on a book through the online catalog. Give workers 24 hours to gather. Park near the main entrance. Call when you arrive, and your items will be brought out.

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