Lima Public Library Book Reviews


LIBRARY ONLINE

• Although the Lima Public Library is temporarily closed, you can still access lots of books, videos and other resources with your library card at www.limalibrary.com/digital.

• The main library has curbside pick up. Hours are 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Call 567-712-5239, contact the library through Facebook Messenger or put a hold on a book through the online catalog. Give workers 24 hours to gather. Park near the main entrance. Call when you arrive, and your items will be brought out.

Fiction

The Mountains Sing by Nguyen Phan Que Mai

During the Vietnam War, Tran Dieu Lan, who was born in 1920, was forced to flee her family farm with her six children during the Land Reform as the Communist government rose in the North. Years later in Ha Noi, her young granddaughter, Huong, comes of age as her parents and uncles head off down the Ho Chi Minh Trail to fight in a conflict that tore not just her beloved country, but her family apart.

So We Can Glow: Stories by Leesa Cross-Smith

From Kentucky to the California desert, these 42 short stories — ranging from the ‘80s and ‘90s to present day — expose the hearts of girls and women in moments of obsessive desire and fantasy, wildness and bad behavior, brokenness and fearlessness and more.

The City We Became by N.K. Jemisin

In Manhattan, a young grad student gets off the train and realizes he doesn’t remember who he is, or even his own name. But he can sense the beating heart of the city, see its history and feel its power. In the Bronx, a Lenape gallery director discovers strange graffiti scattered throughout the city, so beautiful and powerful it’s as if the paint is literally calling to her. In Brooklyn, a politician and mother finds she can hear the songs of her city. And they’re not the only ones.

Under the Rainbow by Celia Laskey

Big Burr, Kansas, is the kind of place where everyone seems to know everyone, and everyone shares the same values — or keeps their opinions to themselves. But when a national nonprofit labels Big Burr “the most homophobic town in the US” and sends in a task force of queer volunteers as an experiment — they’ll live and work in the community for two years in an attempt to broaden hearts and minds — no one is truly prepared for what will ensue.

Non-Fiction

The Back Roads to March: The Unsung, Unheralded, and Unknown Heroes of a College Basketball Season by John Feinstein

Feinstein follows a handful of players, coaches and schools who dream, not of winning the NCAA tournament, but of making it past their first or second round games. Every once in a while, one of these coaches or players is plucked from obscurity to continue on to lead a major team or to play professionally, cementing their status in these fiercely passionate fan bases as a legend.

Machiavelli: The Art of Teaching People What to Fear by Patrick Boucheron

It was Machiavelli’s luck to be disappointed by every statesman he encountered throughout his life — that was why he had to write The Prince. The question remains today, not why, but for whom Machiavelli wrote. For princes, or for those who want to resist them? Is the art of governing to take power or to keep it? And what is “the people?” Can they govern themselves? Beyond cynical advice for the powerful, Machiavelli meditates profoundly on the idea of popular sovereignty, because the people know best who oppresses them.

Do No Harm: The Opioid Epidemic by Harry Wiland

The Opioid Epidemic is the worst man-made drug epidemic in the history of our nation. More people die each year from an opioid drug overdose than in automobile accidents. The statistics are staggering. Do No Harm spotlights experts, journalists and public health crusaders who are combating the special interests of Big Pharma and informing the world on how an aggressive pharmaceutical mass marketing campaign for the new drug OxyContin misled doctors and the public into our current crisis of death and addiction.

Bubble in the Sun: The Florida Boom of the 1920s and How It Brought on the Great Depression by Christopher Knowlton

The 1920s in Florida was a time of incredible excess, immense wealth, and precipitous collapse. The decade there produced the largest human migration in American history, far exceeding the settlement of the West, as millions flocked to the grand hotels and the new cities that rose rapidly from the teeming wetlands. Knowlton breathes dynamic life into the forces that made and wrecked Florida during the decade and the once-in-a-century hurricane whose aftermath triggered the stock market crash.

Children’s

A Superfan’s Guide to Pro Basketball Teams (Sports Illustrated Kids) by Tyler Omoth

So, you call yourself a basketball superfan? Test your knowledge with this compilation of all the need-to-know info about all 30 NBA teams. Each team has a two-page spread detailing their history, home court, championships, top scorers and court legends of past and present. Hoops devotees agree — this guide’s a winner.

Ages 8-13

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LIBRARY ONLINE

• Although the Lima Public Library is temporarily closed, you can still access lots of books, videos and other resources with your library card at www.limalibrary.com/digital.

• The main library has curbside pick up. Hours are 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Call 567-712-5239, contact the library through Facebook Messenger or put a hold on a book through the online catalog. Give workers 24 hours to gather. Park near the main entrance. Call when you arrive, and your items will be brought out.

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