From our readers


Staff reports



Judy Overstreet, now of Loveland, recently wrote to explain she and Phyllis Diller shared the same Aunt Hattie and Uncle Allen J. Driver, who lived at 1165 W. High St. (The house still stands.) She notes Diller reminisced about family get-togethers at their house in her autobiography, “Like a Lampshade in a Whorehouse.” In the photo that Overstreet shared, Hattie is pictured on the far left. Al is on the far right. Lavon Neely is on the animal. The photo was taken in 1912.

Judy Overstreet, now of Loveland, recently wrote to explain she and Phyllis Diller shared the same Aunt Hattie and Uncle Allen J. Driver, who lived at 1165 W. High St. (The house still stands.) She notes Diller reminisced about family get-togethers at their house in her autobiography, “Like a Lampshade in a Whorehouse.” In the photo that Overstreet shared, Hattie is pictured on the far left. Al is on the far right. Lavon Neely is on the animal. The photo was taken in 1912.


Courtesy of Judy Overstreet

An interior view of Williams Brothers grocery store. This photo is undated. The owners also operated a Williams Brothers market in Cridersville.

An interior view of Williams Brothers grocery store. This photo is undated. The owners also operated a Williams Brothers market in Cridersville.


The Lima News file

From left, Elmer Crawford, treasurer; brothers R.J. and S.A. Williams, co-owners; and Delbert Williams, secretary, discuss plans for an open house at the newly enlarged Williams Brothers Super Market at 1121 Latham Ave. This was published in The Lima News Dec. 16, 1954.


The Lima News file

The store was promoted as modern, with refrigeration improvements specifically mentioned in 1954. The meat and frozen food cases had no enclosed top. “In the case, cold air is blown up, around and over the merchandise and thus keeps it under proper refrigeration. The hot air from above keeps the cold air within the circulation area of the display case.”


The Lima News file

Unidentified boys watch Central Junior High School burn in 1966. The arson fire ruined the structure. It was built in 1904 as Lima High School, became Lima Central High School and since 1955 was one of Lima’s two junior highs.


The Lima News file

An interior view of the third floor of Central Junior High School after the fire. The ceiling collapsed, and all the floors were damaged heavily.


The Lima News file

An interior view of the Central High Handbook from 1949-1950 included the lyrics to the “Battle Song.”


The Lima News file

The handbook covered what a student needed to know — school calendar, where bulletin boards with important announcements were located, athletic schedules, education requirements for graduation, supplementary reading lists by grade, clubs and library information. The fine on most books was 2 cents per day. Reserve books (for use during a library period only) had a fine of 10 cents for the first half hour late and 5 cents for every hour following.


The Lima News file

Area readers are always kind in sharing with us their treasured photographs for Reminisce. We continue to accept photos or story ideas of older times and people throughout the region.

If you have photos you think might be of interest to our readers, email amcgeesterrett@aimmediamidwest.com. There is always a good response to the photographs that are used in this section periodically.

Please enjoy these photos that were submitted by readers and retrieved from The Lima News files.

Judy Overstreet, now of Loveland, recently wrote to explain she and Phyllis Diller shared the same Aunt Hattie and Uncle Allen J. Driver, who lived at 1165 W. High St. (The house still stands.) She notes Diller reminisced about family get-togethers at their house in her autobiography, “Like a Lampshade in a Whorehouse.” In the photo that Overstreet shared, Hattie is pictured on the far left. Al is on the far right. Lavon Neely is on the animal. The photo was taken in 1912.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2019/10/web1_postcard.jpgJudy Overstreet, now of Loveland, recently wrote to explain she and Phyllis Diller shared the same Aunt Hattie and Uncle Allen J. Driver, who lived at 1165 W. High St. (The house still stands.) She notes Diller reminisced about family get-togethers at their house in her autobiography, “Like a Lampshade in a Whorehouse.” In the photo that Overstreet shared, Hattie is pictured on the far left. Al is on the far right. Lavon Neely is on the animal. The photo was taken in 1912. Courtesy of Judy Overstreet
An interior view of Williams Brothers grocery store. This photo is undated. The owners also operated a Williams Brothers market in Cridersville.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2019/10/web1_williamsinside.jpgAn interior view of Williams Brothers grocery store. This photo is undated. The owners also operated a Williams Brothers market in Cridersville. The Lima News file
From left, Elmer Crawford, treasurer; brothers R.J. and S.A. Williams, co-owners; and Delbert Williams, secretary, discuss plans for an open house at the newly enlarged Williams Brothers Super Market at 1121 Latham Ave. This was published in The Lima News Dec. 16, 1954.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2019/10/web1_honchos.jpgFrom left, Elmer Crawford, treasurer; brothers R.J. and S.A. Williams, co-owners; and Delbert Williams, secretary, discuss plans for an open house at the newly enlarged Williams Brothers Super Market at 1121 Latham Ave. This was published in The Lima News Dec. 16, 1954. The Lima News file
The store was promoted as modern, with refrigeration improvements specifically mentioned in 1954. The meat and frozen food cases had no enclosed top. “In the case, cold air is blown up, around and over the merchandise and thus keeps it under proper refrigeration. The hot air from above keeps the cold air within the circulation area of the display case.”
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2019/10/web1_williamsoutside.jpgThe store was promoted as modern, with refrigeration improvements specifically mentioned in 1954. The meat and frozen food cases had no enclosed top. “In the case, cold air is blown up, around and over the merchandise and thus keeps it under proper refrigeration. The hot air from above keeps the cold air within the circulation area of the display case.” The Lima News file
Unidentified boys watch Central Junior High School burn in 1966. The arson fire ruined the structure. It was built in 1904 as Lima High School, became Lima Central High School and since 1955 was one of Lima’s two junior highs.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2019/10/web1_central.jpgUnidentified boys watch Central Junior High School burn in 1966. The arson fire ruined the structure. It was built in 1904 as Lima High School, became Lima Central High School and since 1955 was one of Lima’s two junior highs. The Lima News file
An interior view of the third floor of Central Junior High School after the fire. The ceiling collapsed, and all the floors were damaged heavily.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2019/10/web1_fire.jpgAn interior view of the third floor of Central Junior High School after the fire. The ceiling collapsed, and all the floors were damaged heavily. The Lima News file
An interior view of the Central High Handbook from 1949-1950 included the lyrics to the “Battle Song.”
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2019/10/web1_handbookinside.jpgAn interior view of the Central High Handbook from 1949-1950 included the lyrics to the “Battle Song.” The Lima News file
The handbook covered what a student needed to know — school calendar, where bulletin boards with important announcements were located, athletic schedules, education requirements for graduation, supplementary reading lists by grade, clubs and library information. The fine on most books was 2 cents per day. Reserve books (for use during a library period only) had a fine of 10 cents for the first half hour late and 5 cents for every hour following.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2019/10/web1_centralhandbook.jpgThe handbook covered what a student needed to know — school calendar, where bulletin boards with important announcements were located, athletic schedules, education requirements for graduation, supplementary reading lists by grade, clubs and library information. The fine on most books was 2 cents per day. Reserve books (for use during a library period only) had a fine of 10 cents for the first half hour late and 5 cents for every hour following. The Lima News file

Staff reports

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