Real Life Mama: The drop-off line


By Sarah Shrader - Guest columnist



Someone is all ready for school.

Someone is all ready for school.


“Mommy, maybe one morning we can miss the bus.”

“What? No, that is what we are trying to avoid!”

“But then you could take me to school.”

My sweet girl. The whole riding-the-bus thing has been something new to me. As a kid, I never rode the bus. My parents always drove us or we carpooled with other neighborhood kids. But I had never actually taken my baby to school.

Therefore, I couldn’t wait to take off work on Maylie’s first day of school and drop her off. I remember my mom walking me up to my classroom every year. But, the school specifically asked us not to do that — for good reason. I mean, there are plenty of helpers on the first day to make sure they arrive at their classrooms. As parents, we needed to make sure they were on the bus so they could learn their new daily routine.

However, it still wasn’t easy for me to not pass on the tradition I had through my school years. So, when Maylie kept hinting that she wanted me to take her to school, I was secretly super excited to do so. And when Reagan had a morning field trip that I was attending, I saw the perfect opportunity.

In my mind, the morning was going to be perfect. We would sleep in just a bit, after all, we had an extra 20 minutes to spare — 25 minutes in reality but I like to leave some buffer room because I do not have the best track record at being on time.

But without the urgency of missing the bus, those minutes seemed to sneak by. One second we had time to spare and the next we were not even dressed, no shoes on, and hair was still screaming bedhead. Plus, we should had left 5 minutes before to make sure everything was smooth in the drop-off line.

And I had seen all the memes on social media about school drop off. I knew I was not to be the mom that had to sign permission slips, pack back-packs or wait on their child to finish breakfast while in the school drop-off line. Be efficient. Don’t get in the way of the every-day drop-off-parents. I mean, seriously, some parents get angry with those not doing it right, and I did not want to be the one messing things up — both for me and the sake of my baby.

But, you see, I didn’t even know the process to drop off. I had never done it before. Plus, I was rocking the judgment-free-neighborhood-bus-stop look, complete with sweatpants, glasses, mom-bun, no make-up and a cup of coffee.

Fortunately, or maybe unfortunately for Maylie, we never had to make our way through the before school traffic. In fact, we were the only car there when we arrived. As I got my baby out of the car, worried that she wouldn’t know where to go since it was a different drop off than her bus, a school helper let me know that she would get her there, right after they stopped at the office because the bell had already rung.

Total fail. I swear we were only a minute late! One minute! Come on!

I felt like I let my sweet girl down. Heck, I felt like I was in high school again giving Ms. Ricker the run-down of why I was late and begging her to mark it excused. I asked the helper if I needed to come in. Clearly this was a mom mistake and not a kindergartners. She said no, which I was totally grateful for because of my aforementioned appearance.

As I got back in my car feeling defeated, I glanced back at my toddler still in pajamas with her breakfast in her hands and all over her face. And in my head, I praised every parent who does this daily.

Then I messaged Maylie’s teacher. I apologized for her tardiness and assured her she would be back on the bus and on time the next day.

Look, I am clearly not the drop-off Mama. Props to all you parents that are, but I am so truly the run-out-the-door-and-don’t-miss-the-bus kind of parent. I’m so sorry baby, but that is just who your mama is.

Maylie has yet to tell me about her trip to the office. It is still unclear if she is naive to the fact that she was late or just ashamed of me.

Either way, she has yet to ask this mom-of-the-year for a ride to school since.

Sarah (Pitson) Shrader was born and raised in Lima. She is a Lima Central Catholic and Tiffin University graduate. Sarah is a full-time working mama who enjoys writing about her somewhat crazy, always adventurous life as a mother. She lives in Bath Township with her husband, Paul, and their daughters, her writing inspirations, Maylie and Reagan.

https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2018/10/web1_Shrader-Sarah-CMYK-1.jpg
Someone is all ready for school.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2018/10/web1_mama-1.jpgSomeone is all ready for school.

By Sarah Shrader

Guest columnist

Sarah (Pitson) Shrader was born and raised in Lima. She is a Lima Central Catholic and Tiffin University graduate. Sarah is a full-time working mama who enjoys writing about her somewhat crazy, always adventurous life as a mother. She lives in Bath Township with her husband, Paul, and their daughters, her writing inspirations, Maylie and Reagan.

Sarah (Pitson) Shrader was born and raised in Lima. She is a Lima Central Catholic and Tiffin University graduate. Sarah is a full-time working mama who enjoys writing about her somewhat crazy, always adventurous life as a mother. She lives in Bath Township with her husband, Paul, and their daughters, her writing inspirations, Maylie and Reagan.

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