Springview Manor Nursing Home


By Greg Hoersten - For The Lima News



Craft items made for Springview Manor Nursing Home’s annual Christmas bazaar, included country wood crafts, Christmas wreaths, tree ornaments and needlecrafts in 1987. Displaying the items are residents, from left, Florence Jesmain and Margaret Jones (both seated), and Sally McGahan and Bertha Masier (standing).

Craft items made for Springview Manor Nursing Home’s annual Christmas bazaar, included country wood crafts, Christmas wreaths, tree ornaments and needlecrafts in 1987. Displaying the items are residents, from left, Florence Jesmain and Margaret Jones (both seated), and Sally McGahan and Bertha Masier (standing).


This grand opening announcement was published in The Lima News March 31, 1963.

This grand opening announcement was published in The Lima News March 31, 1963.


Ready to send this oversized Valentine card in 1991 are residents of Springview Manor (from left) Bertha Mosier, Ruth Beideischies, Sally McGahan, nurse Cathy Turley, World War II veteran Lee Moore, and World War I veteran Lyman Jones. Residents have signed the card and dubbed the project “Operation Love.” The card was a gift from Ruby Prichard. Turley has two sons serving in the armed forces — one on a Navy ship and the other in Saudi Arabia. Residents say the card is their message of love and prayers.


Robert Mink and Barbara Hutt were reigning royalty for the Valentine’s Day party at Springview Manor Nursing Home on Feb. 14, 1987. Residents sang old and new love songs and enjoyed refreshments donated by Crossroads Crisis Center.


SOURCE

This feature is a cooperative effort between the newspaper and the Allen County Museum and Historical Society.

LIMA — The advertising less than subtly suggested potential residents and their relatives should think of the newly opened Springview Manor Nursing Home as “not an institution … but a home.”

“Both men and women patients enjoy this home away from home for its ‘home-like’ atmosphere and its supervised nursing care,” a May 25, 1963, piece of paid advertising in The Lima News proclaimed.

If Springview Manor was imbued with a “home-like” atmosphere, it came by it honestly. The house at 883 W. Spring St. was a home long before it became a nursing home in March 1963.

At the turn of the century, it was the home of Fred A. Holland, one of Lima’s early movers and shakers. Holland was the son of Samuel K. Holland, who had arrived in Lima with his wife and eight children in 1859 and was one of the local businessmen, including Benjamin C. Faurot, who opened the Lima Paper Mill along the Ottawa River in the northeast section of the city.

“Although prosperous, (Samuel) Holland did not stay long with that business,” the News wrote in a Feb. 26, 2003, story. By 1893, he had established himself as a grocer. Fred Holland eventually followed his father into the business, eventually establishing his own grocery store.

The 1921 history of Allen County notes that he “became one of the extensive business men of the city, and in 1893, built the first five-story business and office block in Lima, to which in 1900 he made a large addition, and it is now the largest building of Allen County.”

That building was called the Holland Block and sat on land formerly occupied by the Holland family home. Today, the Dominion Building occupies the site.

Under the headline “Fred A. Holland, A Brother of Man, Sleeps Last Sleep,” the Lima Times-Democrat reported his death on Jan. 27, 1916. “The Holland block at the southeast corner of Main and High streets stands as a monument to his ability as a business man, and the universal confidence and trust of his patrons of both town and country.”

The competing Republican-Gazette, in a story written the day after his death, described him as an “esteemed citizen of Lima for more than half a century, retired grocer, large property owner, banker and prominent Knight of Pythias” and noted his widow, Jessie Shafer Holland, survived in the family home at 883 W. Spring St.

In 1936, the home would get new owners. A May 24, 1936, real estate ad in the News noted that the “Holland House” was available. “For the first time this beautiful … vitrified (glazed) brick house with double lot, with giant elm trees and two-car garage is being offered,” the ad for real estate agents Steiner and Green read.

For the next decade, 883 W. Spring St. would be the residence of Dr. and Mrs. E.V. Hover. On March, 17, 1946, the News reported another change of ownership. “Dr. E.V. Hover, Lima veterinarian, acquired the former residence of James Arthur, former Lima restaurant operator, at 1630 Oakland Parkway, and the former Hover residence at 883 W. Spring St. became the new home of George C. Hooker, retired farmer.”

Hooker did not get to enjoy the home for long. “George C. Hooker, 68, 883 W. Spring St., a café owner, died at 4:20 a.m. Friday of pneumonia in Memorial Hospital,” the News wrote Oct. 11, 1946. Hooker’s widow, Lola Dell Hooker, died June 13, 1949.

Over the next half dozen years, 883 W. Spring St. would be the home of the William R. Baker family before being sold in about 1955 to Paul Ebner. In May 1962, the home again was put up for sale.

Robert and Nina Hurles purchased the property and, in September 1962, petitioned the city commission for a zoning change. “Hurles wants to change the property from class two residential to class three residential in order to build a private rest home,” the News reported Sept. 19, 1962. The change was approved a week later.

“The building at 883 W. Spring St. is being completely remodeled for a new ultra-modern nursing home which will be operated by the Robert Hurles’, 3445 Makley,” the News reported Jan. 13, 1963. “Mrs. Nina Hurles will operate the facility with Robert Hurles acting as assistant administrator. The new facility will be called Springview Manor Nursing Home …”

Springview Manor opened in March 1963. Minnie Littwitz, who died in 1972, was the first resident. “Since then and because of the wonderfully efficient care of patients and its home-like atmosphere, Springview Manor has grown to the point where reservations for patient care must be made in advance. At the moment, there is a waiting list,” the News wrote Dec. 5, 1964.

Robert Hurles died in October 1997 followed in February 1999 by his wife, Nina.

In September 2001, after 35 years in business, an ad for the by then 43-bed facility proclaimed that “although change has affected other nursing facilities in the community, Springview Manor remains as stable as ever.”

By late 2002, McClellan Health Systems of Perrysburg was operating Springview Manor. On June 2, 2006, the facility passed into the hands of its current operator.

“McClellan Health Systems sold all five of its home to Louisville-based Trilogy Health Services for an undisclosed amount. Included in the sale were Richland Manor in Bluffton, the Heritage and Heritage Estates in Findlay, Leipsic Retirement Village and Genoa Retirement Village,” the News reported. Today, the remodeled and expanded campus has room for 64 residents.

Craft items made for Springview Manor Nursing Home’s annual Christmas bazaar, included country wood crafts, Christmas wreaths, tree ornaments and needlecrafts in 1987. Displaying the items are residents, from left, Florence Jesmain and Margaret Jones (both seated), and Sally McGahan and Bertha Masier (standing).
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2016/11/web1_1987-Xmas-1.jpgCraft items made for Springview Manor Nursing Home’s annual Christmas bazaar, included country wood crafts, Christmas wreaths, tree ornaments and needlecrafts in 1987. Displaying the items are residents, from left, Florence Jesmain and Margaret Jones (both seated), and Sally McGahan and Bertha Masier (standing).
This grand opening announcement was published in The Lima News March 31, 1963.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2016/11/web1_1963_03_31smaller-1.jpgThis grand opening announcement was published in The Lima News March 31, 1963.
Ready to send this oversized Valentine card in 1991 are residents of Springview Manor (from left) Bertha Mosier, Ruth Beideischies, Sally McGahan, nurse Cathy Turley, World War II veteran Lee Moore, and World War I veteran Lyman Jones. Residents have signed the card and dubbed the project “Operation Love.” The card was a gift from Ruby Prichard. Turley has two sons serving in the armed forces — one on a Navy ship and the other in Saudi Arabia. Residents say the card is their message of love and prayers.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2016/11/web1_1991-VD-1.jpgReady to send this oversized Valentine card in 1991 are residents of Springview Manor (from left) Bertha Mosier, Ruth Beideischies, Sally McGahan, nurse Cathy Turley, World War II veteran Lee Moore, and World War I veteran Lyman Jones. Residents have signed the card and dubbed the project “Operation Love.” The card was a gift from Ruby Prichard. Turley has two sons serving in the armed forces — one on a Navy ship and the other in Saudi Arabia. Residents say the card is their message of love and prayers.
Robert Mink and Barbara Hutt were reigning royalty for the Valentine’s Day party at Springview Manor Nursing Home on Feb. 14, 1987. Residents sang old and new love songs and enjoyed refreshments donated by Crossroads Crisis Center.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2016/11/web1_1987-VD-1.jpgRobert Mink and Barbara Hutt were reigning royalty for the Valentine’s Day party at Springview Manor Nursing Home on Feb. 14, 1987. Residents sang old and new love songs and enjoyed refreshments donated by Crossroads Crisis Center.

By Greg Hoersten

For The Lima News

SOURCE

This feature is a cooperative effort between the newspaper and the Allen County Museum and Historical Society.

Reach Greg Hoersten at info@limanews.com.

Reach Greg Hoersten at info@limanews.com.

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