Respiratory viruses spreading earlier than usual


Flu could be next, some doctors fear

By Stacey Burling - The Philadelphia Inquirer



Kelly Moran, a nurse practitioner from south Philadelphia, gives a flu shot to a patient at a CVS Minute Clinic in January 2020.

Kelly Moran, a nurse practitioner from south Philadelphia, gives a flu shot to a patient at a CVS Minute Clinic in January 2020.


Tyger Williams/The Philadelphia Inquirer/TNS

PHILADELPHIA — Pediatricians say that respiratory viruses that usually wait until fall are getting an early start this summer, a surprising trend that may have implications for the fall and winter.

Audrey Odom John, chief of the division of pediatric infectious diseases at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, said her colleagues started referring last month to the weird influx of kids with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and parainfluenza as “Christmas in July.”

Jonathan Miller, chief of primary care at Nemours duPont Hospital for Children in Delaware, said the viruses have been “really exploding,” with 127 positive RSV tests in July, the most since February 2020.

That has Miller thinking ahead to the other respiratory virus that usually infects thousands in the fall and winter. “We’ve had January-type RSV in July, so what does that mean for flu?” he asked.

He thinks it means that flu could also make an early entrance and quickly spread through children, who are good at spreading flu to adults. Miller is recommending that children get flu shots as early as possible this year. (CVS says it will have shots available by mid-August.)

John also worries that this could be an especially bad respiratory virus season as bugs find kids “who went almost two years without exposure” because of masks, social distancing and virtual learning. Now they’re spending more time together, and many families have relaxed their COVID-19 safety measures. Soon kids will return to school with varying degrees of mask usage. She also thinks children should get the shots as early as they can.

On the opposite end of the age spectrum, Ravina Kullar, a spokesperson for the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and an infectious-disease consultant to about 90 nursing homes in Southern California, is worried about unseasonable RSV cases among her elderly patients. Normally, she wants patients to get flu shots by the end of October, but she’s already talking with nursing-home officials and patients about starting early this year. “I would recommend getting it now,” she said. “Never have I recommended a flu shot in August.” She does not want patients older than 65 to be contending with flu and breakthrough COVID-19 cases at the same time.

Other experts said the picture is complicated by unknowable factors. Even in normal non-pandemic years, flu seasons are notoriously difficult to predict, said Christina Tan, epidemiologist for the New Jersey Department of Health. She always recommends that people get their shots, which can slow spread and reduce the seriousness of disease, in late August or September.

Formulas for flu vaccines are set months in advance, and doctors don’t find out how well they match circulating strains of virus until the season gets going. That match is what really determines how bad a flu season is, said Stephen Gluckman, an infectious diseases doctor at Penn Medicine.

Doctors are also worried that anti-vaccine sentiment directed at COVID-19 shots could suppress interest in flu shots. It may also be hard to promote two important vaccines at the same time. “I’m worried that the flu vaccine will get lost in the COVID hubbub,” said William Schaffner, an infectious diseases specialist at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

New flu strains typically emerge in Asia and spread through the southern hemisphere, which has winter during our summer. Travelers then bring the new strains north, so tourism could be another factor. However, doctors pointed out, it won’t take many sick travelers for the virus to find a way in.

It is clear, though, that flu was largely stymied by last year’s COVID safety measures. Gluckman said his hospital usually sees up to a thousand positive flu tests during a season. “There literally was one case this year,” he said.

“We did not have a flu season,” Schaffner said. The line graph of cases “was virtually flat. It was the lowest that’s ever been recorded and in anyone’s memory.”

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Kelly Moran, a nurse practitioner from south Philadelphia, gives a flu shot to a patient at a CVS Minute Clinic in January 2020.
https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2021/08/web1_LIFE-HEALTH-RESPIRATORY-VIRUSES-PH.jpgKelly Moran, a nurse practitioner from south Philadelphia, gives a flu shot to a patient at a CVS Minute Clinic in January 2020. Tyger Williams/The Philadelphia Inquirer/TNS
Flu could be next, some doctors fear

By Stacey Burling

The Philadelphia Inquirer

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