Entertainment Roundup: Jim Carrey says users should yank their Facebook accounts


Actor Jim Carrey poses for photographers in September during the photo call of the film “Jim & Andy: The Great Beyond-The Story of Jim Carrey & Andy Kaufman Featuring a Very Special, Contractually Obligated Mention of Tony Clifton,” at the 74th edition of the Venice Film Festival, in Venice, Italy. Carrey said on Twitter on Tuesday that he’s dumping his Facebook stock and deleting his page because the social media giant profited from Russian interference in the U.S. presidential election via spreading false news with Russian origins and says they’re still not doing enough to stop it.


Domenico Stinellis | AP

LOS ANGELES — Delete your account.

That’s what Jim Carrey says Facebook users should do, as the actor looks to pull the mask off fake news.

The star of “Ace Ventura: Pet Detective” and “The Mask” said on Twitter on Tuesday that he’s dumping his Facebook stock and deleting his page because the social media giant profited from Russian interference in the U.S. presidential election via spreading false news with Russian origins, and says the company is still not doing enough to stop it.

The 56-year-old Carrey encouraged other investors and users to do the same. He ended his tweet with the hashtag “unfriendfacebook.”

Facebook has not responded to Carrey’s tweet, but founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg has said stemming the flow of misinformation is among the company’s foremost goals.

Drake leaves money, goodwill in Miami

MIAMI — OK, we get it: Drake loves Miami.

The 31-year-old Canadian rap star has been spreading money and goodwill throughout the city this week, beginning with a surprise visit to Miami Senior High School on Monday to shoot parts of his new music video “God’s Plan.” He donated $25,000 and promised students they’ll get uniforms designed by his clothing label.

Then he surprised University of Miami student Destiny James with a $50,000 scholarship.

And then, The Miami Herald reports , Drake paid the grocery bills of every shopper inside a Sabor Tropical supermarket. He also gave $50,000 to a non-profit for a homeless shelter where he also dropped $150 Target gift cards for all 130 women residents.

His Instagram photo shows him on the water with a caption saying “Miami thank you.”

Guitarist’s family sues doc over opioids

ATLANTA — The family of a longtime guitarist for the rock group 3 Doors Down is accusing an Alabama doctor of fueling the musician’s opioid addiction before he died of a drug overdose.

Authorities say 38-year-old Matthew Roberts was found dead in August 2016 in a hotel hallway outside Milwaukee, where he was to perform in a charity concert.

In a lawsuit filed recently in Alabama, Roberts’ family says Dr. Richard Snellgrove began prescribing high levels of opioids to the musician in 2006 and continued doing so until days before he died, a decade later.

Other defendants named in the lawsuit include Rite Aid pharmacies, which the family said failed to report Roberts’ suspected drug abuse.

Lawyers for Snellgrove and a representative of Rite-Aid didn’t immediately return phone and email messages Thursday.

Arizona State gets $1.9M to research TV news’ future

PHOENIX — Arizona State University’s journalism school on Thursday was awarded nearly $2 million in funding to research the future of television news.

The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication received the $1.9 million grant from the Knight Foundation that will provide funding over three years to fund initiatives aimed at ensuring TV news companies remain competitive in broadcast and digital storytelling.

Chief among the goals is the establishment of an online hub where newsrooms can see the latest strategies their counterparts elsewhere are trying out.

“The best way I can describe it is I think it’s going to be a resource where someone can come to this site from anywhere and get a sense of what new ideas are floating around in space, what works and what doesn’t,” said Cronkite Associate Dean Mark Lodato.

The school also plans to become a testing ground for improved local news content and dissemination.

“In an academic space like ASU, you can fail and understand the progress. It’s very hard to do that in a corporate environment when corporate dollars and people’s jobs are at risk,” Lodato said.

The desire for experimentation comes as broadcast news companies are under tremendous pressure to keep up with social media and other top content providers, he added.

The Knight Foundation is known for its investment in journalism and the arts in cities where brothers John S. and James L. Knight published newspapers.

Actor Jim Carrey poses for photographers in September during the photo call of the film “Jim & Andy: The Great Beyond-The Story of Jim Carrey & Andy Kaufman Featuring a Very Special, Contractually Obligated Mention of Tony Clifton,” at the 74th edition of the Venice Film Festival, in Venice, Italy. Carrey said on Twitter on Tuesday that he’s dumping his Facebook stock and deleting his page because the social media giant profited from Russian interference in the U.S. presidential election via spreading false news with Russian origins and says they’re still not doing enough to stop it.
http://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2018/02/web1_119821080-bc91c7297be9450fa5f9d6368a4f94e4.jpgActor Jim Carrey poses for photographers in September during the photo call of the film “Jim & Andy: The Great Beyond-The Story of Jim Carrey & Andy Kaufman Featuring a Very Special, Contractually Obligated Mention of Tony Clifton,” at the 74th edition of the Venice Film Festival, in Venice, Italy. Carrey said on Twitter on Tuesday that he’s dumping his Facebook stock and deleting his page because the social media giant profited from Russian interference in the U.S. presidential election via spreading false news with Russian origins and says they’re still not doing enough to stop it. Domenico Stinellis | AP

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