Last updated: August 23. 2013 6:13PM - 220 Views

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An interview with Dr. Bonnie Jones. Her role: Treats animals of all types as a veterinarian at Delphos Animal Hospital.



1. So, how long have you been with the Delphos Animal Hospital?



My husband, John, and I are co-owners. This office is the outcome of Dr. Laman’s practice in downtown Delphos. Dr. Laman took John on while I was working for Dr. [Ron] McNutt. When Dr. Laman retired, we bought his good will and equipment. We bought this building, which used to be Miller’s Furniture and opened the doors in July 1987. We added on in 1999 and again in 2009.



2. How will you celebrate your 25th anniversary?



I thought long and hard as to what we should do. We wanted to give back to the community that helped us grow to what we are today. I had this brainchild of doing an adoptathon. Our goal is to get 25 pets into new homes, but we wanted to reach further and help people, too. So, on [Saturday] from 1 to 4 p.m. we’ll have the Pet Adoptathon. Meals til Monday and Challenged Champions Equestrian Center will be there. Meals til Monday provides food for needy school-age children and Challenged Champions Equestrian Center supports special needs children and adults through horseback riding and other activities. We’ll have the Humane Society of Allen County, Deb’s Dog’s and the Allen County Dog Control Department out with adoptable pets. For entertainment, That Place for Pets will be doing some obedience and agility demonstrations, and we are really excited that Jim Bob McEwen will be giving herding demonstration with his border collies. He’s tough to get. We’ll also have Sgt. Nick Hart and his police dog there. There will be free refreshments and a raffle. The raffle proceeds will be given to the nonprofits. Elida Pet Grooming will also be there, offering free nail trims.



3. How many vets do you have?



There are three of us currently — myself, John and Sara Smith.



4. What kinds of animals do you treat?



We do large animals. John is an ambulatory vet, meaning he goes to farms to treat horses, cattle, pigs and goats. He is something of a goat expert. Sara also dabbles in large animal work. However the percentage of our income driven by large animal work is less than 10 percent. We also do pocket pets like guinea pigs or hamsters, and some bird work. However, we are not avian specialists. Of course, we do dogs and cats.



5. Do you treat more dogs or cats?



Definitely dogs. It’s probably two to one in favor of dogs.



6. What changes have you seen in the veterinarian field in the past 25 years?



I would say the biggest thing is the change in the human animal bond. It’s more intense and the pets are truly a part of the family. Then the next biggest change is technology. We have the ability to do in-house testing. Also, when my husband and I were in school, our veterinarian class was about half men and half women. Now, that number is close to 90 percent women in those classes.



7. What kind of pets do you have?



I have two border collies. They are working dogs, as well as, pets. We have a Pembroke Welsh corgi. She’s young — about 16 months old — and she is just starting to show a herding interest. We have two house cats and a slew of outdoor barn cats. They are pets. We raise chickens and have a flock of Southdown sheep. My husband has been raising, breeding and showing them for many years.



8. What’s the biggest challenge you face as a veterinarian?



I don’t see being a vet as a challenge. I love the job and the variety — different pets, different people, different problems. I’d say the challenges are more goal orientated — to educate people and fulfill our mission statement, which is, “To provide the best veterinary care possible by educating our clients and caring for their pets professionally and with the utmost compassion.”






Dr. Bonnie Jones
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