Last updated: August 24. 2013 4:54PM - 154 Views

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I can see 20/20 about 50 percent of the time. How’s that for sketchy math?



Thankfully, my eyes have always balanced themselves naturally and allowed me to function in life with relative ease. One eye sees great up close, the other does the job on far-away. A perfect system that has worked for more than 50 years.



However, when one of those eyes decides to knock off the job, it becomes problematic. Hence, the glasses I must now wear for driving.



So, the problem becomes remembering my “sometimes” glasses in my senior years.



Last week, I threw on those glasses as I jumped into the car to run errands. About half-way through the run, I needed to switch cars so quickly shuffled my “to-do” items into a neat and handy bag and continued my running.



When I finished my chores, I got back to the car and noticed my glasses were not on my face.



Curses. Where did those things go? I know I am constantly pushing them up on my head for close-up viewing and pulling them back down for the long-distance and sometimes I lose track of them.



A quick scan of the car proved fruitless. Nothing in my purse. I even looked in the mirror to make certain they were not on my head.



Nope. They were missing.



Backtracking on my errand list, I checked all of my stops. No glasses anywhere. I stirred a lot of concern from helpful clerks and secretaries who felt terrible that this poor old gal couldn’t find her way home with no glasses.



But when I got home, I did find my glasses. They were in the car I had started using for my errand list.



Problem solved, at least for the time being. However, I realized I need to focus better in the future so I don’t spin my wheels for an entire afternoon searching for my glasses.



Then I read about training the brain. Sure, some forgetfulness is normal as we age, but this article promised that there were tricks that could help us think more clearly.



Reluctantly, I started reading the story. Did I believe there were tricks to help make me significantly smarter? Not really, yet I read on.



The story claimed that heredity played an important role in how our mind makes neural connections that drive intelligence.



Thankfully for me, both my parents are around for me to check on them. So I watched them closely for about one week. Yeah, they forgot a word every now and then, and sometimes would tell a story I had heard already, but aside from that, they seemed fine.



Hey, they both knew where their glasses were. Guess I needed to look at myself more than them.



I continued reading this train your brain information. I was promised that if I was even close to being a normal person, I could not only think more clearly, I could actually improve my math skills in a few short weeks. Hey, their clinical trial guinea pigs scored 34 percent higher on a math test after training their own brains.



I might just give it a try.



This web-based program for gaining smarts was free, all I had to do was sign up for it.



So I did. On the first screen, and the second.



On the third screen I did something wrong because I was rejected from the program. A short note let me know I wasn’t exactly the person they were looking for in the program. Translated, that meant my brain was untrainable.



I pity my children when the day comes they look to me for hereditary mind traits. Perhaps I can throw them a curve and tell them to wear contact lenses so they never face the missing eyeglasses problem.



I may not be able to train my brain, but I’m still pretty good at the mind games.


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